Last 15 days

General News/UKSP Business:

Nuggets:

    Meetings/Workshops/Summer Schools:

    Jobs/Studentships:


    General News/UKSP Business:

    ST15 ‘MHD Waves and Instabilities in the Solar Atmosphere: Identification and Modelling’, AOGS 2019 – deadline extended to 19 February 2019

    from Viktor Fedun [February 14, 2019]

    We would like to draw your attention to the ST15 session: ‘MHD Waves and Instabilities in the Solar Atmosphere: Identification and Modelling’ in the framework of Asia Oceania Geosciences Society (AOGS) conference. The 16th Annual AOGS will take place in Singapore, 28 July-02 August 2019. Further details regarding abstract submission, registration, accommodation and relevant deadlines can be found on the meeting website: http://www.asiaoceania.org/aogs2019/public.asp?page=abstract.htm

    Important! Abstract submission deadline is 19 February 2019.

    ST15 ‘MHD Waves and Instabilities in the Solar Atmosphere: Identification and Modelling’

    Conveners:
    Dr Viktor Fedun (The University of Sheffield, United Kingdom), v.fedun@sheffield.ac.uk
    Dr Wernher Brevis (Pontificia Universidad Catolica de Chile, Chile), wbrevis@ing.puc.cl
    Dr Sergiy Shelyag (Deakin University, Australia), shelyag@gmail.com
    Dr Marco Stangalini (INAF-OAR National Institute for Astrophysics, Italy), marco.stangalini@inaf.it
    Dr Gary Verth (The University of Sheffield, United Kingdom), g.verth@sheffield.ac.uk

    Session Description
    Space-based and ground solar observations have detected a variety of plasma waves, oscillations, and instabilities (e.g., fast/slow/EUV waves, global kink and sausage mode oscillations, Alfven waves) propagating in the magnetised plasma structures on the Sun. These magnetic configurations are observed across a wide range of spatio-temporal scales (e.g., small scale flux ropes in the surface-granulation pattern, spicules, solar prominences, coronal loops). Over the last years, due to both technical advancements and improved inversion techniques, spectropolarimetry has become an import tool for the investigation of the plasma-magnetic field interaction in the solar atmosphere, providing new diagnostics useful for the study and identification of MHD waves and modes in different magnetic concentrations, down to the present resolution limit of solar telescopes (100-150 km). However, forthcoming and recently launched next generation of solar observational facilities e.g. The Daniel K. Inouye Solar Telescope (DKIST) and European Solar Telescope (EST), COronal Solar Magnetism Observatory (COSMO), Solar Orbiter and Solar Probe, thanks to their unmatched spatial resolution and spectropolarimetric sensitivity and accuracy, will further advance our possibilities, by providing an unprecedented view of the mechanisms of excitation and dissipation of MHD waves in the solar atmosphere. Development of mathematical models (analytical and numerical) and data analysis techniques of observable solar plasma structures can help us fully utilize their diagnostic capabilities and better understand the role of various plasma processes in energy transport across different layers of the solar atmosphere. The proposed session will provide us an excellent platform to bring together world-leading experts in solar observational analysis and numerical analytical / modelling, in order to exploit different approaches in the investigation of plasma processes in the solar atmosphere.

    With our Best Regards,
    Viktor Fedun, Wernher Brevis, Sergiy Shelyag, Marco Stangalini and Gary Verth

    http://www.asiaoceania.org/aogs2019/public.asp?page=home.htm

    Nordic Optical Telescope: OPTICON Call for proposals

    from Sian Giles-Titcombe [February 14, 2019]

    The OPTICON common call for EU supported access to telescopes in semester 2019B (1 October 2019 – 1 April 2020) is open. It will close on 28 February 2019 at 23.59UT exactly.

    The NORDIC OPTICAL TELESCOPE offers a total of 25 nights per semester.

    For the details of the announcement, see:

    https://www.astro-opticon.org/h2020/tna/call/call-2019b.html

    ALL non-Nordic and non-Spanish proposals for the Nordic Optical Telescope MUST be submitted through the OPTICON common proposal and evaluation system.

    We would like to *emphasize* that apart from regular visitor mode, the NOT also offers (queue) service mode observing and provides a wide range of options for flexible scheduling through Target-of-Opportunity programs and/or monitoring programs on any time-scale (from hours, to days, to weeks, to months, to years).

    *We note that*

    – A set of 2 holographic diffuser are available to do high-precision photometry with ALFOSC. The diffuser effectively scrambled the incoming light, providing a more constant and optimal (`top-head’) shape, with minimal light loss, significantly reducing any
    systematic effects in the photometry. The diffusers provide a very stable stellar image with a size (~FWHM) of between ~5 and ~7.5 arcsec, depending on where they are mounted. See for more information: http://www.not.iac.es/instruments/alfosc/diffuser.html

    – The SOFIN high-resolution Echelle spectrograph is again available. It only is offered to do circular spectro-polarimetry with the
    medium-resolution (R~80,000) camera. SOFIN is not a common-user instrument: only limited support is provided.

    Kind regards,
    Thomas Augusteijn
    Director, NOTSA

    https://www.astro-opticon.org/h2020/tna/call/call-2019b.html

    Software in Solar Physics Survey

    from Stuart Mumford [February 13, 2019]

    The SunPy Project would like to conduct a survey about software use in solar physics. This survey is based on a similar one conducted by Ivelina Momcheva and Erik Tollerud in 2015, who surveyed 1142 astronomers about software use in astrophysics (https://arxiv.org/abs/1507.03989).

    This short, 12-question survey will help us understand how to develop better tools and resources for the community. We would really appreciate it if you could take a few minutes to fill it out!

    https://docs.google.com/forms/d/1PxWWzjWqxqEPLxQ-ppnY7f8dKLwNOZDXsbCwidDlA58

    Thank you,
    The SunPy Project

    https://docs.google.com/forms/d/1PxWWzjWqxqEPLxQ-ppnY7f8dKLwNOZDXsbCwidDlA58

    Influencing the future ESA archives (including for Solar Orbiter).

    from Louise Harra [February 11, 2019]

    I’d like to briefly discuss an opportunity for you to influence the way you will be able to access data in the future from ESA. I am a member of the ESA Heliophysics Archives User Group (HAUS). This was all new to me as I personally hadn’t used ESA archives before but Solar Orbiter data will be available from them (http://soardev.esac.esa.int/soar-beta/#home).
    The plasma community will know this better through Cluster, and there are planetary archives as well. SOHO is obviously there as well. https://www.cosmos.esa.int/web/esdc

    The ESA HAUS committee want to collate short science cases on how to use their archives in different ways – this can be combining datasets such as planetary with solar, solar with astronomy, or modelling with anything. Is there anything would make your research easier? Enable you to answer science questions that are currently difficult now? Or enable you to address Solar Orbiter questions with more ease? jHelioviewer comes under the ESA wing for example. These science cases will be used to help mould how the archives will look in future. The science cases will be short, and your input is important for the future. Guidance for your input is given below – no more than 1 A4 page. Please send to me at l.harra @ ucl.ac.uk by the end of March.

    Science case format:

    Science goal: provide science questions that are currently challenging to carry out with separate archives.

    Archives and modelling required: describe which datasets and archives are necessary to carry out this work.

    Ideal situation of data sources: in an ideal world, describe how the data access and modelling interaction could be easier.

    pfsspy: a new python package for PFSS calculations

    from Richard Morton [February 9, 2019]

     pfsspy, a new python package for computing Potential Field Source Solutions, has just had its first release (0.1). This package builds on code written by Anthony Yeates (https://github.com/antyeates1983/pfss) to provide an accessible, well documented, and freely available code for calculating PFSS solutions in python.

     

    pfsspy can be installed from PyPi using

     

                    pip install pfsspy

     

    Documentation can be found here:

    https://pfsspy.readthedocs.io/en/latest/

     

    and two examples of use here:

    https://pfsspy.readthedocs.io/en/latest/auto_examples/index.html

     

    Any suggestions or bugs can be reported on the issue tracker: https://github.com/dstansby/pfsspy/issues

    Congratulations

    from Richard Morton [February 4, 2019]

    The UKSP council would like to offer their congratulations to our colleagues selected by Elsevier as “most valued reviewers in 2018”:
    https://www.journals.elsevier.com/new-astronomy/reviewers/thank-you-reviewers-newast-14


    Nuggets:


    Meetings/Workshops/Summer Schools:

    ST15 ‘MHD Waves and Instabilities in the Solar Atmosphere: Identification and Modelling’, AOGS 2019 – deadline extended to 19 February 2019

    from Viktor Fedun [February 14, 2019]

    We would like to draw your attention to the ST15 session: ‘MHD Waves and Instabilities in the Solar Atmosphere: Identification and Modelling’ in the framework of Asia Oceania Geosciences Society (AOGS) conference. The 16th Annual AOGS will take place in Singapore, 28 July-02 August 2019. Further details regarding abstract submission, registration, accommodation and relevant deadlines can be found on the meeting website: http://www.asiaoceania.org/aogs2019/public.asp?page=abstract.htm

    Important! Abstract submission deadline is 19 February 2019.

    ST15 ‘MHD Waves and Instabilities in the Solar Atmosphere: Identification and Modelling’

    Conveners:
    Dr Viktor Fedun (The University of Sheffield, United Kingdom), v.fedun@sheffield.ac.uk
    Dr Wernher Brevis (Pontificia Universidad Catolica de Chile, Chile), wbrevis@ing.puc.cl
    Dr Sergiy Shelyag (Deakin University, Australia), shelyag@gmail.com
    Dr Marco Stangalini (INAF-OAR National Institute for Astrophysics, Italy), marco.stangalini@inaf.it
    Dr Gary Verth (The University of Sheffield, United Kingdom), g.verth@sheffield.ac.uk

    Session Description
    Space-based and ground solar observations have detected a variety of plasma waves, oscillations, and instabilities (e.g., fast/slow/EUV waves, global kink and sausage mode oscillations, Alfven waves) propagating in the magnetised plasma structures on the Sun. These magnetic configurations are observed across a wide range of spatio-temporal scales (e.g., small scale flux ropes in the surface-granulation pattern, spicules, solar prominences, coronal loops). Over the last years, due to both technical advancements and improved inversion techniques, spectropolarimetry has become an import tool for the investigation of the plasma-magnetic field interaction in the solar atmosphere, providing new diagnostics useful for the study and identification of MHD waves and modes in different magnetic concentrations, down to the present resolution limit of solar telescopes (100-150 km). However, forthcoming and recently launched next generation of solar observational facilities e.g. The Daniel K. Inouye Solar Telescope (DKIST) and European Solar Telescope (EST), COronal Solar Magnetism Observatory (COSMO), Solar Orbiter and Solar Probe, thanks to their unmatched spatial resolution and spectropolarimetric sensitivity and accuracy, will further advance our possibilities, by providing an unprecedented view of the mechanisms of excitation and dissipation of MHD waves in the solar atmosphere. Development of mathematical models (analytical and numerical) and data analysis techniques of observable solar plasma structures can help us fully utilize their diagnostic capabilities and better understand the role of various plasma processes in energy transport across different layers of the solar atmosphere. The proposed session will provide us an excellent platform to bring together world-leading experts in solar observational analysis and numerical analytical / modelling, in order to exploit different approaches in the investigation of plasma processes in the solar atmosphere.

    With our Best Regards,
    Viktor Fedun, Wernher Brevis, Sergiy Shelyag, Marco Stangalini and Gary Verth

    http://www.asiaoceania.org/aogs2019/public.asp?page=home.htm

    AOGS 2019 Abstract-Submission Deadline Extended to 19 February 2019

    from Mario M. Bisi [February 14, 2019]

    Dear All.

    I’d like to let you know that the abstract-submission deadline for AOGS in Singapore this year has been extended to 19 February 2019. Submission and meeting details can be found here: http://www.asiaoceania.org/aogs2019/ and the abstract submission is done through the MARS Login at the top-right-hand side of the screen.

    I would also like to draw your attention to two sessions: ST28 – Radio Heliophysics from Sun to Mud: How Radio Techniques can be Used to Study the Chain of Activity from Solar Origin to its Effects at Earth and Other Solar-System Bodies and ST 27 – General Session in Solar and Terrestrial Sciences. The full session details are below.

    Many thanks,

    Mario (Space Weather Secretary and ST President Candidate)

    ST28: This session brings together all things Radio Heliophysics in nature, crossing all the sub-disciplines within Heliophysics from Solar, Heliosphere, Magnetosphere, Ionosphere, Planetary, Space Weather, and Beyond. The session encourages submissions around all aspects and use of radio in the Heliophysics domain, including but not limited to observations, data analyses, results discussions, modelling, use in space-weather forecasting, planetary science outside of the Earth’s own space environment, technique developments/needs, and future/developing instrumentation. Any and all abstracts linking into or using radio Heliophysics will be welcome in this session to try to bring the wider community into a single joined-up session.

    ST27: This session is intended to cover all general contributions from the Sun to the Earth and beyond throughout the heliosphere. Contributions from helioseismology, solar physics, heliospheric science, space weather, magnetospheric physics, ionospheric physics, sun-planetary interactions, cosmic rays, and all aspects of the heliosphere and outer heliosphere are welcomed – particularly if they do not fit any of the more-specialised ST Sessions.

    http://www.asiaoceania.org/aogs2019/

    NAM Session: Active Region Laboratories

    from Paolo Pagano [February 14, 2019]

    We would like to encourage abstract submission for the NAM 2019 session on Active Region Laboratories.

    Active regions are of fundamental importance in Solar Physics as they are the primary source of a multitude of solar activity that occur on a variety of spatial and temporal scales. In particular, the formation and eruption of magnetic flux ropes, the generation and propagation of MHD waves, solar flares and the acceleration of energetic particles. In this session we bring together state-of-the-art models and high-resolution observations of active regions and their associated phenomena in order to review recent advances in the field and discuss requirements for future missions with an outlook towards active regions on other stars and stellar flares.

    The abstract submission is now open.

    NAM will take place at Lancaster University on 30th June – 4th July 2019

    P. Pagano, S. L. Yardley, A. W. James, L. M. Green

    https://nam2019.org/science/abstract-submission

    IAU Symposium 355

    from Sian Giles-Titcombe [February 12, 2019]

    Registration, abstract submission and grant applications are now open

    Dear Colleagues,

    We are pleased to announce IAU Symposium 355 on “The Realm of the Low Surface Brightness Universe”, which will be held from July 8 to 12, 2019, at the Guajara Campus of the University of La Laguna in the island of Tenerife, Spain.

    With this first announcement we open the registration, the abstract submission, and the possibility to apply for IAU grants, all through the conference webpage at http://www.iac.es/congreso/iaus355/

    ———————
    Rationale and Key Topics:

    IAU Symposium 355 aims to survey the denizens of the low surface brightness skies, at all wavelengths and resolutions, to show the richness of physical processes taking place in this regime, which has not been fully explored yet. From the Zodiacal light in the Solar System all the way to the cosmological backgrounds, and from the contributions of amateurs to space-based instrumentation, this Symposium will provide participants with a broad glimpse of one of the few last niches that remain to be explored.

    A wide range of topics will be addressed:

    – State-of-the-art in present and future ground- and space-based instrumentation for LSB observations
    – Data analysis and management of upcoming LSB surveys
    – The nature of interplanetary/cometary dust grains and meteoritic streams in the Zodiacal light
    – Dust grains in the interstellar medium as traced by cirri
    – Mass loss episodes, shocks and debris discs as traced by LSB features around stars; orphan SN and GRBs
    – Low surface brightness features around galaxies: signatures of past and on-going accretion and their constraints on dark haloes
    – The nature of ultra-diffuse galaxies and other galaxies discovered by LSB surveys
    – The intracluster light and its role in galaxy evolution in clusters
    – The circumgalactic medium of low- and high-redshift galaxies
    – The cosmic web of large-scale filaments
    – The UV/optical/IR cosmological background radiation and its fluctuations
    – The role of amateurs in LSB observations and citizen science LSB projects
    ———————
    We look forward to seeing you in Tenerife in July!

    David Valls-Gabaud, on behalf of the SOC Johan Knapen, on behalf of the LOC
    Conference webpage: http://www.iac.es/congreso/iaus355/
    Conference contact email: iaus355@viajeseci.es

    http://www.iac.es/congreso/iaus355/

    NAM 2019 abstract submission now open

    from Jim Wild [February 11, 2019]

    The online abstract submission system for the 2019 Royal Astronomical Society National Astronomy Meeting is now open at https://nam2019.org The deadline for abstract submissions is 15 March.

    NAM 2019 will be held at Lancaster University between Sun 30 June – Thu 4 July. Further information and a full list of parallel sessions is available on the event website. Additional practical information will be added to the site prior to registration opening on Mon 25 February, but it is not necessary to register to submit an abstract.

    Key dates to note:

    11 Feb: Abstract submission opens
    25 Feb: Registration opens
    15 March: Abstract submission closes
    Early May: Abstract acceptance notices and final timetable published
    20 May: Registration deadline for presenters
    14 June: General registration (e.g. for non-presenters) closes. There will be no on-site registration.

    The LOC and SOC look forward to welcoming you to Lancaster in the summer!

    nam2019@lancaster.ac.uk

    https://nam2019.org

    7th Space Climate Symposium: Future of Solar Activity, 8-11 July 2019, Orford, Canada

    from Ilya Usoskin [February 9, 2019]

    Space Climate 7: Future of Solar Activity
    8-11 July 2019, Orford, Canada:

    The 7th Space Climate Symposium will be held on 8-11 July 2019 in Canton Orford, in Québec’s beautiful Eastern townships, about one hour drive from Montréal.

    The scientific program includes the following sessions (and confirmed speakers so far):
    Solar dynamo as a driver of space climate (S. Brun, M. Schüssler, J. Warnecke)
    Long-term solar activity (H. Hayakawa, A. Muñoz-Jaramillo, A. Pevtsov, K. Tapping)
    Solar photosphere and TSI/SSI (N. Krivova, T. Woods)
    Solar cycle prediction (M. Dikpati, J. Jiang, D. Pesnell, K. Petrovay, L. Upton)
    Solar corona, solar wind and heliosphere (P. Manoharan, G. Petrie, A. Rouillard)
    Solar wind-Magnetosphere-Ionosphere interaction (A. Chambodut, A. Pulkkinen, C. Rodger)
    Solar Influence on atmosphere and climate (M. Mlynczak, M. Sinnhuber, B. Tinsley)

    For registration, abstract submission, accommodation, airport shuttle and else, see the meeting web page:

    IMPORTANT DATE: 28 February 2019

    This is the early registration deadline. Fee will raise on 1 March 2019.

    ABSTRACT SUBMISSION:

    28 February 2019 is also the submission deadline for abstracts to be considered for a contributed oral presentation. Abstracts for poster presentations can be submitted even later, as long as space for posters or conference premises are filled up.
    NOTE: Conference capacity is limited to 120 participants so register and send your abstract as early as possible.

    INVITATION LETTERS AND VISA:

    Please let us know (spaceclimate7[at]astro.umontreal.ca) as early as possible if you need an invitation letter for visa application. Note also that meeting participants from countries not requiring an entry visa may still have to file in an Electronic Travel Authorization. See meeting web site for more details. Do not delay visa application, this can be a lengthy process depending on your nationality, country of residence, and/or dual-citizenship status.

    ACCOMODATION:

    Canton Orford is a small countryside village, with no public transportation and very limited taxi services. We highly recommend securing accommodation at the meeting venue, Hotel Estrimont Suites & SPA, taking advantage of the housing package offered.
    Please book early, as the Hotel’s capacity is limited.

    http://craq-astro.ca/spaceclimate7/

    AOGS 2019 ST20 Solar Flare Forecasting Using Machine Learning

    from Róbertus Erdélyi [February 1, 2019]

    We would like to draw your attention to the abstract submission deadline of 12 Feb 2019 for session “AOGS 2019 ST20 Solar Flare Forecasting Using Machine Learning”.

    We would also encourage you to send in an abstract and come to this session.

    http://www.asiaoceania.org/aogs2019/public.asp?page=home.htm


    Jobs/Studentships:

    University of Hawai‘i, Institute for Astronomy (Pukalani, Maui) – Solar Physics Postdoctoral Fellow

    from Richard Morton [February 15, 2019]

    SOLAR PHYSICS POSTDOCTORAL FELLOW – ID# 19025.

    Institute for Astronomy.  Non-Regular, Full-Time, Limited Term (Up to two (2) years in duration with possibility of extension for an additional year), RCUH Non-Civil Service position with the Institute for Astronomy (IfA), located in Pukalani, Maui, Hawai‘i.  Continuation of employment is dependent upon program/operational needs, satisfactory work performance, availability of funds, and compliance with applicable Federal/State laws.

    MINIMUM MONTHLY SALARY:  $3,455/Mon.

    DUTIES:  Participates in several NASA-grant research projects that study the solar active region magnetic fields and their relation to solar eruptive events. Performs extrapolation modeling to understand the magnetic field evolution and the structure of magnetic flux ropes. Assists with the development of a new data-driven model of the coronal magnetic field. Pursues collaborative and independent research in solar physics. Publishes articles in peer-reviewed scientific journals and presents results at conferences.

    REQUIRES:  PhD from an accredited college or university in Physics, Astronomy, or related field. (PhD candidates may apply but must submit evidence of PhD completion upon hire).  One to three (1 – 3) years of research experience in solar physics or related field, with at least one (1) first-authored, peer-reviewed article in credited scientific journals.  Scientific background in solar physics.  Proficiency in scientific programming with Interactive Data Language (IDL) and/or Python, and C and/or Fortran. Demonstrated ability to analyze solar data. Demonstrated ability to conduct independent research and collaborate with colleagues.

    SECONDARY QUALIFICATIONS:  Experience in solar physics research related to magnetic fields measurement or numerical modeling. Experience with parallel computation and data visualization.

    INQUIRIES:  Dr. Xudong Sun 573-9513 (Maui).

    CLOSING DATE: March 1, 2019 or until filled. Applications received after this deadline may be considered only if the position is not filled or up to the date a selection has been approved by the RCUH (whichever comes first).

    RCUH’s mission is to support and enhance research, development and training in Hawai‘i, with a focus on the University of Hawai‘i.

    Equal Opportunities Employer – Minorities/Women/Disability/Veteran.

    University of Oslo, Rosseland Centre for Solar Physics – 1–2 positions as Research Software Engineer

    from Richard Morton [February 15, 2019]

    The positions as Research Software Engineer are connected to the Rosseland Centre for Solar Physics (RoCS) funded by the Research Council of Norway and the University of Oslo from November 1st, 2017. The primary goal of RoCS 10-year effort lies in understanding the workings of the energetic Sun. To attack this goal a concerted effort of numerical modelling, both fluid (extended MHD) and particle oriented, will be combined with high quality observations taken at ground based and space based observatories to produce models of the active Sun. Application deadline is February 28. More information and application procedure: www.jobbnorge.no/en/available-jobs/job/164113/research-software-engineer

    Research Fellow in Solar Physics and Space Plasma Physics

    from Suzanne Winter [February 15, 2019]

    We are advertising for a Research Fellow to undertake research in the area of Solar Orbiter science in the Department of Space and Climate Physics (Mullard Space Science Laboratory) at University College London (UCL). The mission is due to be launched in 2020 with new data expected to be available a few months later. This post will bridge the expertise of both the MSSL Solar Physics and Space Plasma Physics groups. Both groups have academic-level involvement in key instruments on the mission. A key question for the Solar Orbiter mission is understanding the source regions of the various states of the solar wind, and determining how the characteristics of those sources influence its evolution through the heliosphere. The post-holder will combine solar remote sensing observations with in-situ data from current missions and combine with modelling to address this question, and initially prepare for, but then deliver some of the science returns of Solar Orbiter.

    The Solar Physics group is an established group within UCL’s Mullard Space Science Laboratory (MSSL) at the forefront of solar physics research in the UK. We are the PI group for the EIS instrument on Hinode, and Co-PI on the EUI instrument on the Solar Orbiter mission. We have additional roles in the development of the visible light cameras for DKIST and in the development of the EST and Solar C EUVST projects.
    The Space Plasma Physics group is a growing group within UCL/MSSL, undertaking research at the forefront of magnetospheric and solar wind research in the UK. Currently, we have four Academics, two independent research fellows, three post-doctoral research associates and five PhD students. We are the PI group for the PEACE instruments on Cluster and Double Star, and for the Solar Wind Analyzer (SWA) suite on the Solar Orbiter mission. The laboratory is also the PI institute of the SMILE mission and for the Lagrange in-situ instrument package.

    The applicant will be expected and encouraged to participate in wider scientific activities of the two research groups, including preparations for future solar and space plasma research missions. This position also offers the opportunity for travel for the post-holder to present their work at relevant national and international conferences and workshops. The post is available from 1 April 2019 for a three-year period, with a possible extension subject to funding availability through the MSSL Consolidated Grant.

    The Mullard Space Science Laboratory is located on its own campus in the beautiful Surrey Hills, surrounded by woodland. UCL was one of the first universities in the world to become involved in making scientific observations in space. Since MSSL was established in 1966, we have participated in over 40 satellite missions with the European Space Agency, NASA (US), Japan, Russia, China and India, and flown over 230 rocket experiments.
    Informal enquiries should be made to Louise Harra (l.harra@ucl.ac.uk) or Chris Owen (c.owen@ucl.ac.uk).
    Applications should be completed on line http://www.ucl.ac.uk/hr/jobs/. However if you are having difficulty accessing the on-line recruitment system please contact Suzanne Winter (s.winter@ucl.ac.uk) for advice.

    https://atsv7.wcn.co.uk/search_engine/jobs.cgi?SID=amNvZGU9MTc5MjIwNSZ2dF90ZW1wbGF0ZT05NjUmb3duZXI9NTA0MTE3OCZvd25lcnR5cGU9ZmFpciZicmFuZF9pZD0wJmpvYl9yZWZfY29kZT0xNzkyMjA1JnBvc3RpbmdfY29kZT0yMjQ=

    Lecturer in Mathematics and Physics

    from Gunnar Hornig [February 9, 2019]

    Dear Colleagues,

    The School of Science and Engineering at the University of Dundee invites applications for a lectureship (Lecturer, Senior Lecturer or Reader level) for a joint position between Physics and Mathematics in a field which complements the existing research strengths in solar magnetohydrodynamics, scientific computing, exoplanet systems and star formation (see https://www.dundee.ac.uk/scienceengineering).

    For further details see https://www.jobs.ac.uk/job/BQA484/lecturer-in-mathematics-and-physics-astrophysics-teaching-and-research

    The closing date is the 20th of March 2019. For further information about this position, please contact Gunnar Hornig (g.hornig@dundee.ac.uk).

    UAF in Fluid Dynamics at Leeds

    from Richard Morton [February 4, 2019]

    Dear Colleagues,

    As part of the strategic investment associated with the Leeds Institute for Fluid Dynamics (https://fluids.leeds.ac.uk/), the University of Leeds has recently posted an advert for a University Academic Fellow in Fluid Dynamics:

    https://jobs.leeds.ac.uk/vacancy.aspx?ref=MAPMP1006

    This University Academic Fellowship is  a permanent post at a level equivalent to Lecturer / Assistant Professor, leading to promotion to Reader / Associate Professor within five years, subject to probation.

    The closing date for applications is 10th March 2019. Please contact Steve Tobias <S.M.Tobias@leeds.ac.uk > for further information.