Last 32 days

General News/UKSP Business:

Meetings/Workshops/Summer Schools:

Jobs/Studentships:

Nuggets:


General News/UKSP Business:

RAS Caroline Herschel Prize Lectureship

from Natasha Jeffrey [April 12, 2021]

APPLICATIONS SOUGHT FOR THE 2021 CAROLINE HERSCHEL PRIZE LECTURESHIP

The Caroline Herschel Prize Lectureship was established by what is now the Herschel Society, in association with the Royal Astronomical Society,to celebrate Caroline’s memory by supporting promising female astronomers early in their careers.

Applications, which should be made by 30 April, are now open for the 2021 Prize Lectureship.

The award will be based on individual applications assessed by a small expert committee under the auspices of both Societies. Details on the award itself, eligibility, and the application form, are available here: http://herschelsociety.org.uk/caroline-herschel-prizelectureship/

Please contact awards@ras.ac.uk if you have any questions.

Next UK-SOSS talk – 10am on 15th April 2021

from Chris Nelson [March 30, 2021]

Dear all,

I have the pleasure of bringing your attention to the next UK-SOSS talk which will be delivered by Prof. Richard Harrison from RAL. The zoom link, title, and abstract are below.

All the best,
Chris Nelson, on behalf of the organisers (Marianna Korsos and Jiajia Liu)

Taking stock of our understanding of Coronal Mass Ejections

Professor Richard A Harrison MBE
Chief Scientist, RAL Space

Zoom link: https://zoom.us/j/95338171418
Meeting ID: 953 3817 1418

This presentation will take stock of where we are with Coronal Mass Ejection (CME) research, taking a brief look at the history of CME observations and the early interpretations of the phenomenon, through to the present day where we have multi-spacecraft observations with coronagraphs and heliospheric imagers and a wide range of modelling techniques, many of which are now geared towards space weather impacts. This is a research area that has matured dramatically, since the launch of the SOHO spacecraft in particular, but especially with the increased interest in space weather and missions such as STEREO and Lagrange. It is a good time to take stock and in doing so to revisit some basic issues, including the flare-CME relationship, stealth CMEs, coronal dimming and CME-CME interactions, as well as lessons learnt from imaging and tracking CMEs in the corona and in the heliosphere. Perhaps it is also a useful time to pause and ask the questions, what else do we want to know about CMEs, and how are we going to satisfy that desire?

https://solarphysics.aber.ac.uk/uk-soss.php

Cycle-12 e-MERLIN Call for Proposals

from Steve Brygan [March 25, 2021]

e-MERLIN/VLBI National Radio Astronomy Facility
www.e-merlin.ac.uk
Invitation for Proposals: Cycle-12
Deadline for Receipt of Proposals:
23:59:59 UT on 13th May 2021
Full Details: http://www.e-merlin.ac.uk/observe.html

e-MERLIN requests proposals from the international astronomical community for observations to be made during Cycle-12. Proposals are competitively peer-reviewed under standard STFC rules by the Programme Allocation of Telescope Time (PATT) e-MERLIN Time Allocation Group. Allocation will be made on the basis of scientific merit and technical feasibility alone.

e-MERLIN Science: e-MERLIN observations address a broad range of science topics, http://www.e-merlin.ac.uk/science.html and its unique combination of angular resolution (mas) and sensitivity (microJy) provide crucial insights in multiple science areas including:

• Star-formation and black hole growth in galaxies.
• The physical processes which govern the formation of stars.
• The modes of activity in nearby galaxies.
• Transient radio sources.
• Radio spectral lines (masers and in absorption).
• The energetic processes in relativistic outflows from jets generated by black holes and compact objects.
• Along with multiple other applications.

e-MERLIN provides high angular resolution (12 – 150 milli-arcsec) and high sensitivity (micro-Janksy) imaging at cm wavelengths as well as polarimetry, spectroscopy, and astrometry. e-MERLIN is an SKA-pathfinder instrument providing observations with resolutions and frequencies comparable to those that will be provided by SKA1-mid.

Cycle-12 e-MERLIN Capabilities
[e-MERLIN observations between August 1st, 2021 and January 31st, 2022 ]
Deadline for Receipt of Proposals:
23:59:59 UT on 13th May 2021

Ang. res. Sensitivity
L-band (1.25 – 1.75 GHz) ~150 mas ~12 uJy/bm*
C-band (4.5 – 7.5 GHz) ~ 40 mas ~10 uJy/bm*
K-band (19 – 25 GHz) ~12 mas ~130 uJy/bm

* Assumes inclusion of the Lovell Telescope at L/C-band and a full imaging track (~12hrs including calibration). It is envisaged that a limited amount of Lovell time will be available for PATT programmes during Cycle 12. The full invitation for proposals, including technical specifications, and links to the e-MERLIN Sensitivity Calculator are available at: www.e-merlin.ac.uk/observe.html.

Access and financial support for e-MERLIN Scientists and Users: e-MERLIN is open to all users with projects allocated solely on the basis of scientific merit and technical feasibility. Additionally, e-MERLIN is one of the participating infrastructures in the European Union’s Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme, the OPTICON-RadioNet PILOT project was launched on March 1st, 2021. This programme will provide facility access and financial support for users from eligible projects in Cycle-12. For further information or contact e-MERLIN staff (emerlin@jb.man.ac.uk).

EVN+e-MERLIN Observations: The full integration of e-MERLIN telescopes within the European VLBI Network is also available. This mode of observing provides e-MERLIN’s additional ‘short-spacing’ (10 – 200 km) component available to the EVN which allows imaging of a wider range of spatial scales. Proposals for e-MERLIN + EVN observations should be made via the EVN Programme Committee rather than through e-MERLIN directly. The next Call for EVN Proposals (including combined e-MERLIN + EVN observations) is detailed at www.evlbi.org. The next deadline for EVN proposals is October 1st , 2021.

e-MERLIN/VLBI National Facility, The University of Manchester,
Jodrell Bank Observatory,
Macclesfield,
Cheshire SK11 9DL,
United Kingdom
emerlin@jb.man.ac.uk

OBSERVING OPPORTUNITY WITH THE WHT – PRIME FOCUS IMAGING

from Steve Brygan [March 23, 2021]

(With apologies to those who receive this notice more than once)

OBSERVING OPPORTUNITY WITH THE WHT – PRIME FOCUS IMAGING

During the integration of WEAVE at the WHT, an opportunity has arisen
to offer service-mode imaging with a camera (the QHY) mounted behind
the new WEAVE prime-focus corrector, during April and May 2021.

The QHY camera (model QHY6000L) is based on a back-illuminated
scientific CMOS detector, with 9576 × 6388 3.8-μm pixels, giving a
field of view of 10.7′ × 7.1′, at a scale of 0.067 “/pixel, which will
be binned 2×2 or 4×4.

The camera is equipped with a 5-position filter wheel, offering the
following filters: Sloan u and i, Astronomik B (which might soon be
replaced by Sloan g, with similar bandpass), Astronomik R (might
soon be replaced by Sloan r) and a broad-band (‘clear’) luminance
filter L-1.

Further details about the instrument can be found on the instrument
webpage:

http://www.ing.iac.es/astronomy/instruments/pf-qhy/

The service application form can be found on:

http://catserver.ing.iac.es/service/phase1.php?instrument=PFQHY

The form can be used to submit proposals,

at any time until 11 April 2021 (24:00 GMT).

The proposals will be graded by the three national TACs and
the highest-ranking proposals will be queued for service-mode observing.

Marc Balcells

Webinar Wednesday is now two weeks away!

from Steve Brygan [March 23, 2021]

Dear Colleagues,

Webinar Wednesday is now two weeks away!

Starting on 7th April 2021, Webinar Wednesday is a programme of monthly webinars which aims to celebrate impact and innovation developed through STFC funded science. Each webinar is on the first Wednesday of the month, between 10 and 11.

Sessions are informal and are designed to link/engage the STFC community with potential collaborators, promote network building, hear about previously funded projects, and provide information about upcoming opportunities. Each session is free to attend and will feature a different theme each month. Please see the schedule below for the first 6 months.

Date Talk Speaker

7th April – Welcome to Webinar Wednesday – Jason Green (STFC), Tony Soteriou (UKRI), Lee Thompson (University of Sheffield)

5th May – STFC External Innovations and Horizons Programme, including IAA – Wendy Carr / Isabella Panovic / Andi Kidd

2nd June – Innovations in the STFC Facilities – Liam Brennen and Marcus French

7th July – Innovation from the STFC community – Sarah Bugby (Loughborough University) Peter Hargrave (Cardiff University)

4th August – Summer break

1st September – Innovate UK and Kromek – Dave Wilks (Innovate UK) and representative from Kromek

STFC Annual Innovations Showcase and Networking Event

If you are interested, please contact innovationsclub@stfc.ac.uk directly to register or for more information. Please feel free to share with any colleagues/collaborators who you think may be interested.

NuSec Science Network Summer 2021 Pilot Project Applications

from Steve Brygan [March 19, 2021]

NuSec Science Network Summer 2021 Pilot Project Applications

Following on from the success of previous NuSec funded Summer Student pilot projects, applications are being sought for Summer 2021 pilot projects from UK universities, companies or government laboratories researchers.
Projects must be from the Natural Sciences and show the potential to enhance the field of nuclear security.
Projects could involve the development of an early research idea, a small proof of concept or a feasibility study undertaken by an Undergraduate or Post Graduate and supervised by a Univeristy Academic or Industrial Scientist.
Applications are welcomed from collaborations between UK Universities, companies or government laboratories and must be submitted by Midday 26th April 2021.
Funding is available for 5 Summer Pilot Projects Up to a maximum of £4,000 each
For further details please visit the NuSec Science Network website

UK-US Academic Network in Nuclear Security and Non-Proliferation Skills
The NuSec Science Network are launching a new UK-US Academic Network in Nuclear Security and Non-Proliferation Skills in Partnership with the NNSA ETI, MTV and NSSC consortia.

NuSec will offer grants to support mobility and training activities to develop collaboration between UK and US researchers working in nuclear security and non-proliferation technologies.

NuSec-NNSA collaboration grants are available to UK researchers wishing to collaborate with the NNSA consortia on the following activities:-

• Short term postdoctoral research projects (up to 3 months), up to £15,000
• Undergraduate student interns/summer research projects, up to £2,000
• Research visits, up to £5,000
• Conferences, training and collaboration visits, up to £2,000.

A workshop will be held on 27-28 April 2021 to formally launch the call for UK applications and provide opportunities for US and UK researchers to connect. The main objective of the workshop will be to showcase the current research in nuclear security and non-proliferation from the UK and from the three NNSA consortia. The program will consist of invited presentations from UK and US researchers, and will include an overview of research activities carried out in the NNSA consortia.

The workshop will be run as a Zoom meeting over 2 consecutive afternoons 3-6.45pm (UK time). Attendance at both afternoon sessions is advised and workshop pre-registration is required.

Please visit this NuSec Website Events Web page for further details of the Workshop Program and How to Register.

https://www.nusec.uk/news/2021/01/06/call-2021-nusec-summer-projects/

Space Weather Instrumentation, Measurement, Modelling and Risk (SWIMMR) – Project S5

from Steve Brygan [March 19, 2021]

Further to the Call announcement below, we would like to draw your attention to an amended Compliancy Table in Section 8.3 of the Announcement of Opportunity; applicants must use this version when preparing their proposals.

STFC would like to invite proposals for the development and demonstration of a prototype network of compact instruments for ground-level neutron monitoring, ideally suitable for unattended operation in relatively remote locations, to mitigate the potential radiation hazards of space weather. This topic forms part of the UKRI Space Weather Instrumentation, Measurement, Modelling and Risk (SWIMMR) project which is funded as part of the UK Research and Innovation (UKRI) Strategic Priorities Fund (SPF).

There are two phases to the project: the design phase and implementation phase.
Applicants must firstly submit a proposal for a design study. Upon the successful completion of the design phase, and subject to funding, the team will be invited to apply for funding for the implementation phase of the project.

Funding is split across the two phases as follows:
1. Design Study – a maximum value of £140,000 (this is the Research Council 80% contribution), for a duration of up to 12 months.
2. Implementation phase – it is expected that the maximum value of the implementation phase may be £1,260,000 (this is the Research Council 80% contribution) over a maximum of 24 months following successful completion of the design phase, but this budget is yet to be confirmed. The implementation phase must be completed by 31st March 2024 at the latest.

Full proposals must be submitted via the Research Council’s Joint Electronic Submission (Je-S) system by 16:00 on Tuesday 13th April 2021. If any intending applicants are unable to meet this deadline due to the impact of the Covid-19 pandemic, they should contact STFC as soon as possible (see below).

Full details of the call, including the application process, eligibility requirements, assessment process and criteria are available on the UKRI website at the link provided below.

Please note that this Call is for Project S5 only.

For any enquiries, please contact:

Sarah Garlick, Senior Programme Manager, STFC Programmes Directorate: Sarah.Garlick@stfc.ukri.org or
Ian McCrea, SWIMMR Senior Programme Manager, RAL Space: Ian.McCrea@stfc.ac.uk

https://www.ukri.org/opportunity/swimmr-s5-networkable-instruments-for-ground-level-neutron-monitoring/


Nuggets:

RHESSI Nuggets in March 2021

from Hugh Hudson [March 30, 2021]

http://sprg.ssl.berkeley.edu/~tohban/wiki/index.php/RHESSI_Science_Nuggets

No. 402, “FLUKA as a tool for interpreting flare gamma-rays,” by Alec MacKinnon. The nuclear phyics of solar flares captured in a detailed model.

No. 403, “The Neupert Effect revisited,” by Jiong Qiu. Two time scales for heating individual flare strands.

No. 404, “The superflare SOL2017-09-06,” by Guillermo Giménez de Castro. Glimpsing the “missing decades” of the flare emission spectrum.

No. 405, “Tracing the sources of gradual solar energetic particle events,” by David Brooks and Stephanie Yardley. Chemical abundances in SEPs suggest an origin in flare-related moss regions.

No. 25, “Return currents and soft-hard-soft spectral evolution,” by Valentina Zharkova and Mykola Gordovskyy. A classic Nugget revisited.

We welcome contributions to the RHESSI Nuggets, and the topics may wander some distance away from specifically RHESSI results if they are generally interesting. See http://sprg.ssl.berkeley.edu/~tohban/wiki/index.php/RHESSI_Science_Nuggets for these and others. Comments about specific flares can often be found by searching for their SOLyyyy-mm-dd identifier from this home page.


Meetings/Workshops/Summer Schools:

Summer School – High Resolution Solar Physics

from David Kuridze [April 18, 2021]

The Solarnet- High resolution solar physics summer school will be held as online summer school beginning of September 2021. Register as soon as possible, there is still room for participants.

MORE DETAILS:

https://solarnet-project.eu/High-Resolution-Solar-Physics

BEST REGARDS
Arnold Hanslmeier

Reminder: NAM 2021 Abstract Deadline 30th April

from Natasha Jeffrey [April 15, 2021]

The deadline for abstract submissions for parallel sessions taking place at the Royal Astronomical Society National Astronomy Meeting, NAM2021, is Friday 30th April 2021 at 17:00 UTC.

The meeting will be a virtual conference taking place on 19-23 July.

For more details on the meeting, and to submit an abstract please follow the link at https://nam2021.org.

European Solar Physics Meeting (ESPM16)–1st Announcement

from Istvan Ballai [April 14, 2021]

Welcome to the 16th European Solar Physics Meeting (ESPM-16)!
https://indico.ict.inaf.it/e/ESPM-16

Save the dates in your diary!

The next European Solar Physics Meeting (EPSM-16) will be organised as a fully online conference in the period 6-10 September 2021.

The meeting was originally planned to take place in the wonderful city of Turin, but as a result of the current pandemic situation, it was decided to be organised in a different way.

In order to encourage a wide participation, the meeting is going to be FREE for all registered participants.

ESPM is the most important solar physics gathering in Europe, bringing together scientists from all over the world, active in the theoretical, observational and modelling studies of the Sun and its effects in the heliosphere. The ESPM-16 sessions will be devoted to solar interior and dynamo, fundamental plasma processes in the solar atmosphere, solar eruptions, particle acceleration, solar wind and solar-terrestrial relations, including space weather and space climate. New results from the latest spaceborne solar missions and ground-based observatories studying the Sun and solar wind will be presented and discussed during the conference.

ESPM-16 is organized by the Board of the European Solar Physics Division (ESPD, http://solar.epsdivision.org), a joint Division of the European Physical Society (EPS) with support from INAF-Turin Astrophysical Observatory and European Space Agency (ESA).

Important dates:
Registration will be open from 1st April to 1st August, 2021: https://indico.ict.inaf.it/event/794/registrations/225/

Call for Abstracts will be open from 1st April to 1st June, 2021: https://indico.ict.inaf.it/event/794/abstracts/

https://indico.ict.inaf.it/e/ESPM-16

Reminder: NAM 2021 Session – Space weather and plasma processes: From the Sun to the Earth

from Karen Meyer [April 9, 2021]

We would like to invite abstract submissions to the UK National Astronomy Meeting 2021 session:
“Space weather and plasma processes: From the Sun to the Earth”

The session is scheduled for the afternoons of Thursday 22nd and Friday 23rd July 2021.

Link to session description: https://nam2021.org/science/parallel-sessions/details/2/82

The deadline for abstract submission is 1700hrs (UTC) on Friday 30th April 2021: https://nam2021.org/science/abstract-submission

S. Bentley, M. Korsos, K. Meyer, T. Bloch, S. Bloomfield, R. Boynton, T. Elsden, R. Harrison, P. Pagano, A. Smith

NAM 2021 Session – From Plasma to Galactic Dynamics: Collisionless Physics Across the Universe

from Oliver Allanson, Thomas Neukirch, Chris Hamilton, Luca Franci, Jean-Baptiste Fouvry [April 7, 2021]

We invite abstract submissions for a session ‘From Plasma to Galactic Dynamics: Collisionless Physics Across the Universe’ at the VIRTUAL UK National Astronomy Meeting, 19th-23rd July, 2021, https://nam2021.org/.

We would also like to highlight that there are a significant number of other GEM/solar/magnetospheric/space weather/space plasma physics related sessions at NAM 2021, https://nam2021.org/science/parallel-sessions.

Abstract deadline is Friday 30th April 2021 at 1700 UTC. Full details can be found at https://nam2021.org/science/parallel-sessions/details/2/107.

Invited speakers: David Burgess (Queen Mary University of London) & Benoit Famaey (Observatoire astronomique de Strasbourg).

The dynamics of many physical systems across the Universe are well described using the collisionless approximation: for which the mean free path is significantly larger than the most important length scales. In these cases, the statistical evolution of many bodies is determined by the collisionless Boltzmann (aka the Vlasov) equation. From the Earth’s radiation belts, through the magnetosphere, solar wind, interstellar medium and beyond to even more exotic relativistic and high-energy astrophysical environments, charged particle dynamics are commonly collisionless. One of the most important implications of low collisionality is the departure of particle distributions from thermal equilibrium. This, and other effects, play a vital role in diverse plasma physics phenomena such as wave-particle interactions, magnetic reconnection, collisionless shocks, cross-scale coupling and turbulence. Furthermore, the evolution of galaxies themselves is often treated as a collisionless process, with galactic dynamics and other self-gravitating systems also modelled using Vlasov theory. One important and common theme that unites these seemingly disparate plasma and gravitational applications is the fact that in the absence of collisions/thermalisation, nature needs to find another route to dissipate energy. Kinetic plasma instabilities are one such route; and in disk galaxies, the Landau damping of density waves on resonantly orbiting stars is thought responsible for the ‘heating’ of the stellar velocity distribution. Modern satellites such as MMS, Parker Solar Probe and Solar Orbiter are revealing the true kinetic nature of plasma within our solar system. Analogously, the Gaia satellite is revealing signatures of these kinetic effects in the Milky Way. Furthermore, increasing computational power is making more ambitious kinetic and hybrid numerical experiments a reality (e.g. the system-scale kinetic modelling undertaken by the Vlasiator group). In astrophysics, N-body simulations are becoming so efficient that direct comparison with the kinetic theory is achievable. In this inter-disciplinary session we welcome all observational, theoretical and modelling work that considers the physics of collisionless systems – in either (or both of) the plasma and gravitational contexts.

NAM 2021 Session: Solar Physics Open Session

from Natasha Jeffrey [April 1, 2021]

We invite abstract submissions for the Solar Physics Open Session at the National Astronomy Meeting (NAM) 2021.

Solar Physics Open Session:
The activity of our nearest star, the Sun, drives variability within the heliosphere in a myriad of different ways, impacting the Earth and other planets within the solar system. As the only star on which we can begin to resolve physical processes at their intrinsic scales, the Sun provides a unique laboratory for plasma astrophysics. In this session we welcome all contributions describing advances relating to physical processes occurring from the interior to the outer atmosphere, based on space- or ground-based observations, simulations or theory that fall outside the remit of other specialist sessions.

Organiser(s)
Sarah Matthews, Anne-Marie Broomhall, Ryan Campbell, Andrew Hillier, Natasha Jeffrey, Marianna Korsos, Jiajia Liu, Eamon Scullion

The deadline for abstract submission is 1700hrs (UTC) on Friday 30th April 2021.

https://nam2021.org/science/parallel-sessions/details/2/86

Online Radio Heliophysics Catch-up – 10-13 May 2021 (NEW DATES) – Zoom – Final Announcement!

from Mario M. Bisi [April 1, 2021]

Dear Colleagues.

Due to the ongoing pandemic situation with COVID-19, gatherings are still very much discouraged (or not possible) and therefore meetings must be moved online.

The radio heliophysics catch-up meeting/workshop (please see: http://orhc.cbk.waw.pl/wp/) aims to gather online a worldwide community from wide radio heliophysics domains and make a room for light, informal meeting where scientific and technical discussions can take place together with any updates on activities and progress made by individual groups around the world. This is aimed at the PhD researcher and above. It will cover work from relevant COSPAR ISWAT teams (see: https://iswat-cospar.org/) as well as those just working within our community. The meeting will address the variety of topics including: IPS data analyses, their assimilation in 3-D Heliospheric tomographic and MHD models, Heliospheric Faraday rotation (FR) investigations, ionospheric scintillation studies, and act as a follow-up for current and upcoming space missions like Parker Solar Probe and Solar Orbiter. The planned four-day virtual meeting on Zoom will give opportunity to establish closer working relations and share experience across different methods of radio data analysis as well as better plan and coordinate our fit into the COSPAR ISWAT structure.

The meeting will be held 10-13 May 2021 (NEW DATES) (across four days), and the core sessions each day will be three hours in duration running 13:00UT-16:00UT where additional discussion sessions are held earlier and later on some of the days and/or as needed during the meeting. The meeting is aimed to take on the flavour of an informal workshop with plenty of time for discussion, hands-on collaborations/breakouts, and planning going forward.

For more information as it becomes available and to register (there is NO REGISTRATION FEE), please go to: http://orhc.cbk.waw.pl/wp/ – the closing deadline for both registration and abstract submission is: 07 April 2021.

Very many thanks, and we look forward to seeing you “virtually” in mid-May…

Mario.

On behalf of the Online Organising Committee (OOC):
Mario M. Bisi, UKRI STFC RAL Space
Barbara Matyjasiak, CBK PAN
Richard Fallows, ASTRON
Hanna Rothkaehl, CBK PAN

http://orhc.cbk.waw.pl/wp/

NAM 2021 Session: DKIST and Solar Orbiter era observations and modeling of photospheric and chromospheric plasma flows and magnetic elements at fine scales.

from Suzana S. A. Silva [March 30, 2021]

We are pleased to invite you to submit an abstract for oral and/or poster presentation consideration at the National Astronomy Meeting 2021 for the session:

DKIST and Solar Orbiter era observations and modeling of photospheric and chromospheric plasma flows and magnetic elements at fine scales.

The session focuses on current and future observing synergies for multi-instrument, high-resolution observations and development of advanced numerical MHD simulations describing the many phenomena at the lower atmosphere in both quiet Sun and active regions. We encourage broad participation of our colleagues to advertise their related research, especially on the following topics:

Small-scale photospheric magnetic fields;
Coherent plasma motions (e.g., vortices, source / sink type motions and laminar flows; spicules, swirls, ellerman bombs, magnetic bright points, sunspot structures/flows)
Energy transport between lower and upper solar atmosphere layers;
Turbulent plasma processes.

The deadline for abstract submission is 1700hrs (UTC) on Friday 30th April 2021. Due to the covid-19 pandemic, the NAM 2021 will be held online. For abstract submission, please follow this link https://nam2021.org/science/abstract-submission and further information on the session can be found at https://nam2021.org/science/parallel-sessions/details/2/113

Regards,
Suzana SIlva, Rekha Jain, Eamon Scullion

https://nam2021.org/science/parallel-sessions/details/2/113

Registration Deadline 12 April 2021: RAS Specialist Discussion Meeting

from Jiajia Liu [March 29, 2021]

Dear Colleague,

The registration deadline has been extended to 12 April 2021 for the Royal Astronomical Society Specialist Discussion Meeting on Friday, 14 May 2021 (https://ras.ac.uk/events-and-meetings/ras-meetings/mhd-oscillations-and-waves-photosphere-corona). The topic is “MHD oscillations and waves from the photosphere to the corona”.

The vast presence of MHD waves and oscillations in the solar atmosphere is now unquestionable. However, it is still an open question as to how these waves and oscillations contribute to the heating of the solar atmosphere and the acceleration of the solar wind. A range of new instrumentation including e.g. the PSP, DKIST and Solar Orbiter, have recently become available providing us data with unprecedented resolution observed from close to the Sun to the Earth for studying MHD oscillations and waves.

Discussions will take place around topics including but not limited to: the propagation of waves from the lower to the upper solar atmosphere; the application of solar magneto-seismology (SMS) to structuring in the atmosphere of the Sun; the detection of MHD waves and oscillations in the solar atmosphere and interplanetary space; and the prospects for major advances using the next generation of solar instrumentation.

Hereby, we cordially invite colleagues to contribute to and participate in the discussions. We also encourage all those interested to present their related SUCs or specific observing sequences that would help to achieve the wave-related science goals with the upcoming 4-m class solar telescopes.

The meeting will be hosted online. It will consist of a series of invited and contributed talks together with discussions. Invited speakers include Dr. Anne-Marie Broomhall (Warwick), Prof. Hui Tian (PKU), and Prof. Manuel Collados (IAC, TBC). Depending on the number of contributions we may hold a virtual poster discussion.

Online registration is now open until 12 April 2020 via

https://forms.office.com/Pages/ResponsePage.aspx?id=6ner6qW040mh6NbdI6Hyhkzr5DRqHfhEs7BoTe71eJdUQzAzRTMzUEU2QTBXM1ZFMVdWSkVJVjVPWC4u&lang=en

Best Regards,

Jiajia Liu (QUB), Chris Nelson (QUB), Robertus Erdélyi (UoS), Mihalis Mathioudakis (QUB)

NAM 2021 Session: Chromospheric dynamics and energy transport

from Natasha Jeffrey [March 25, 2021]

We invite abstract submissions to the session entitled ‘Chromospheric dynamics and energy transport’ at the UK National Astronomy Meeting(19th-23rd July 2021)
https://nam2021.org/science/abstract-submission

The solar chromosphere is a challenging region to study from both theoretical and observational standpoints. Effects such as non-equilbirium ionisation, non-Local Thermal Equilibrium, 3D scattering effects, and partial redistribution of frequencies are often critical to model and interpret observed features. Moreover, this region is a crucial for understanding the Sun’s atmosphere since it acts as a conduit for energy, connecting the pressure dominated photosphere, and the magnetically dominated corona, as well as acting as in interface with the corona that can influence coronal heating.

The complexity of the solar chromosphere requires the development of new observational and numerical techniques that untangle the physics of this tumultuous region. This session will address these issues, presenting the latest techniques to accurately stitch together then science of the corona and the photosphere by analysing the dynamics and energy transport through the chromosphere. With the new generation of satellites and ground based telescopes looming, launching and preparing for first light, it is a fruitful time for both modeling and observing new behaviors in features such as fibrils, spicules, pores, vortices, and jets, as well as events like flares, Ellerman bombs and UV bursts.

Regards,
Malcolm Druett, Ben Snow


Jobs/Studentships:

12 Early-Stage Researcher positions open in Space Weather Awareness Training Network (SWATNet)

from Emilia Kilpua [April 14, 2021]

The Space Weather Awareness Training Network (SWATNet) is a Marie – Sklodowska – Curie Action Innovative Training Network (ITN) project. The project aims at breakthroughs in our physical understanding of the key agents of Space Weather.

We are now in the process of hiring 12 Early-Stage Researchers (ESRs) to pursue their PhD degrees. The project is funded by the European Commission under the framework of the Horizon 2020 Marie Skłodowska-Curie Innovative Training Networks Programme, Grant Agreement No 955620.

SWATNet educates 12 PhD students in the field of heliophysics with training led by experienced supervisors in a  challenging, inherently international and interdisciplinary research environment. The consortium consists of nine Parties from eight European countries, as well as several recognized companies in the field. The PhD projects focus on analysing and forecasting solar activity, solar eruptions and energetic particles  accelerated by these eruptions. Students will use state-of-the-art observations and research techniques, including cutting-edge numerical simulations of the solar corona and the inner heliosphere, as well as machine learning analysis methods.  All students will be introduced to the basics of solar observations at our partner observatory and conduct 1-3 months of industrial training. The ITN provides a very competitive salary and additional mobility and family allowances

The positions are limited to a duration of 36 months and they are full-time. This period includes an obligatory 6-12 month period of project related work (i.e., Secondment) in another SWATNet host country. The positions may be extended according to national regulations and depending on the availability of additional funds. Students do not need to defend their thesis during the project, but must be enrolled in a doctoral programme leading to the award of joint/double doctoral degrees.

The deadline of the applications is 7 May 2021 [at 23:59 local time at the host]. The application period may however vary due to the local university rules/times, see the project descriptions

See the eligibility, selection criteria, project descriptions and instructions how to apply from
https://swatnet.eu/?page_id=1119
https://euraxess.ec.europa.eu/my/offer-postings/622411/

PhD opportunities (3.5 years, fully-funded) within the Solar and Space Physics research group at Northumbria University (Newcastle upon Tyne, UK). Deadline = 28th April 2021

from James McLaughlin [April 13, 2021]

The Solar and Space Physics research group at Northumbria University (Newcastle upon Tyne, UK) is inviting applications for full-time PhD studentships for an October 2021 or March 2022 start.

These are 3.5 year studentships and are funded by a STFC Doctoral Training Partnership.

This year, we are offering PhDs on the following topics:

————————————————————————–
• Plasma thermodynamics of the inner heliosphere with Solar Orbiter and Parker Solar Probe
principal supervisor: Dr Robert Wicks
https://www.findaphd.com/search/ProjectDetails.aspx?PJID=131335
————————————————————————–
• Determining global plasma waves in Earth’s magnetosphere from ground observations
principal supervisor: Dr Sarah Bentley
https://www.findaphd.com/search/ProjectDetails.aspx?PJID=131337
————————————————————————–
• What makes geomagnetic storms so special?
principal supervisor: Professor Jonathan Rae
https://www.findaphd.com/search/ProjectDetails.aspx?PJID=131333
————————————————————————–
• Exploring fundamental MagnetoHydroDynamic (MHD) properties of solar chromospheric magnetic fields, via a unique observation of a large-scale swirl and associated magnetic null point
principal supervisor: Dr Eamon Scullion
https://www.findaphd.com/search/ProjectDetails.aspx?PJID=131334
————————————————————————–
• Modelling an X-class solar flare combining observations, electron beam transport physics and MHD numerical simulations
principal supervisor: Dr Gert Botha
https://www.findaphd.com/search/ProjectDetails.aspx?PJID=131336
————————————————————————–

Full details can be found at: https://sites.google.com/view/solarphysicsnu/research/phd-projects-2021

For informal questions, please contact the relevant supervisor, and/or contact Professor James McLaughlin james.a.mclaughlin@northumbria.ac.uk

Deadline for applications: 28th April 2021

Start Date: 1st October 2021 or 1st March 2022

—–Overview of the research group—–
The Solar and Space Physics group is a large and successful group, and our long-term research programme is to understand all aspects of the solar-terrestrial connection. Evidence of the group’s success includes funding from STFC, NERC, UK Space Agency, Leverhulme Trust, Royal Astronomical Society, the US Air Force, a STFC Ernest Rutherford Fellow and a UKRI Future Leader Fellow. The group also plays multiple roles in the UKRI SWIMMR (Space Weather Instrumentation, Measurement, Modelling and Risk) programme in support of the UK Met Office.

https://sites.google.com/view/solarphysicsnu/research/phd-projects-2021

PhD opportunities (3.5 years, fully-funded) within the Solar and Space Physics research group at Northumbria University (Newcastle upon Tyne, UK). Deadline = 28th April 2021

from James McLaughlin [March 30, 2021]

The Solar and Space Physics research group at Northumbria University (Newcastle upon Tyne, UK) is inviting applications for full-time PhD studentships for an October 2021 or March 2022 start.

These are 3.5 year studentships and are funded by a STFC Doctoral Training Partnership.

This year, we are offering PhDs on the following topics:

————————————————————————–
• Plasma thermodynamics of the inner heliosphere with Solar Orbiter and Parker Solar Probe
principal supervisor: Dr Robert Wicks
https://www.findaphd.com/search/ProjectDetails.aspx?PJID=131335
————————————————————————–
• Determining global plasma waves in Earth’s magnetosphere from ground observations
principal supervisor: Dr Sarah Bentley
https://www.findaphd.com/search/ProjectDetails.aspx?PJID=131337
————————————————————————–
• What makes geomagnetic storms so special?
principal supervisor: Professor Jonathan Rae
https://www.findaphd.com/search/ProjectDetails.aspx?PJID=131333
————————————————————————–
• Exploring fundamental MagnetoHydroDynamic (MHD) properties of solar chromospheric magnetic fields, via a unique observation of a large-scale swirl and associated magnetic null point
principal supervisor: Dr Eamon Scullion
https://www.findaphd.com/search/ProjectDetails.aspx?PJID=131334
————————————————————————–
• Modelling an X-class solar flare combining observations, electron beam transport physics and MHD numerical simulations
principal supervisor: Dr Gert Botha
https://www.findaphd.com/search/ProjectDetails.aspx?PJID=131336
————————————————————————–

Full details can be found at: https://sites.google.com/view/solarphysicsnu/research/phd-projects-2021

For informal questions, please contact the relevant supervisor, and/or contact Professor James McLaughlin james.a.mclaughlin@northumbria.ac.uk

Deadline for applications: 28th April 2021

Start Date: 1st October 2021 or 1st March 2022

Overview of the research group
The Solar and Space Physics group is a large and successful group, and our long-term research programme is to understand all aspects of the solar-terrestrial connection. Evidence of the group’s success includes funding from STFC, NERC, Leverhulme Trust, Royal Astronomical Society, the UK Space Agency, the US Air Force, and a UKRI Future Leader Fellow. The group also plays multiple roles in the UKRI SWIMMR (Space Weather Instrumentation, Measurement, Modelling and Risk) programme in support of the UK Met Office.

https://sites.google.com/view/solarphysicsnu/research/phd-projects-2021