Last 32 days

General News/UKSP Business:

Meetings/Workshops/Summer Schools:

Jobs/Studentships:

Nuggets:


General News/UKSP Business:

RAS Council Nominations

from Natasha Jeffrey [November 12, 2019]

The nominations for RAS Council are open.

The deadline for nominations is the 29 November.

In the Geophysics category, there are up to 3 councillor positions and one vice-president position available.

We strongly encourage interested members of the community to consider standing for election.

Further details on the RAS Council elections can be found here:

https://ras.ac.uk/news-and-press/news/council-nominations-2020-0.

Developing A World Class Research Programme – Update from the Solar System Advisory Panel (SSAP)

from Sian Giles-Titcombe [November 8, 2019]

Dear All,

We are writing to convey the outcome of this year’s priority project “light touch” review, specifically with reference to those projects within the remit of SSAP. We would like to thank all the PIs that originally submitted ideas, and those who provided updates to their projects over the summer. SSAP strongly believe that all the projects submitted are underpinned by strong scientific drivers in the SSAP area.

The “light touch” review was undertaken with a unified approach by SSAP and AAP, considering factors that have led to priority project development (in STFC or other research councils) or new funding for priority projects (1/51 projects in the STFC remit) in the last 12 months. After careful discussion, it was agreed by SSAP and AAP not to select any project where the remit clearly overlaps with UKSA (i.e. space missions or TRL 4+), reflecting STFC’s focus on ground-based observations, science exploitation and TRL 0-3 development. Whilst in no way reflecting the excellence of the science, or community scientific wishes, this approach has resulted in some changes to the list of SSAP priority projects. However, now, unlike at the time of the original call, it is clear that such projects cannot move forwards without UKSA (financial) support, and such funds are already committed according to UKSA’s existing programme. SSAP remain strongly supportive of mission-led science in solar-system exploration, so SSAP have strongly recommended that the high-level discussions between UKSA and STFC continue with a view to supporting a clear joint priority projects call in future, more naturally suited to mission and bi-lateral opportunities.

The priority projects (and PIs) identified by SSAP for 2019/20 are:-

1. Solar Atmospheric Modelling Suite (Tony Arber)
2. LARES1: Laboratory Analysis for Research into Extra-terrestrial Samples (Monica Grady)
3. EST: European Solar Telescope (Sarah Matthews)
SSAP requested STFC continue to work with all three projects to expand their community reach and continue to develop the business cases for future (new) funding opportunities. In addition, SSAP have requested that STFC explore ways in which the concept of two projects,

“ViCE: Virtual Centres of Excellence Programme / MSEMM Maximising Science Exploitation from Space Science Missions”

can be combined and, with community involvement, generate new funding for science exploitation and maximising scientific return in solar-system sciences. Initially this consultation will occur between SSAP and STFC.

We would like to thank the community again for its strong support, and rapid responses on very short timescales. A further “light touch” review will occur in 2020, with a new call for projects anticipated in 2021. SSAP continue to appreciate the unfamiliar approach a “call for proposals with no funding attached” causes to the community and are continuing to stress to STFC that the community would appreciate clearer guidance and longer timescales in future priority project calls.

Yours sincerely

Dr Helen Fraser on behalf of SSAP

Quantum Technologies for Fundamental Physics – Reminder

from Georgina Bennett [October 25, 2019]

Quantum Technologies for Fundamental Physics – Intention to Submit

Please note that the deadline for the Intention to Submit for the STFC/EPSRC Quantum Technologies for Fundamental Physics call is 16.00 on 31 October 2019.

The link to the Intention to Submit form and further information about the call can be found at https://stfc.ukri.org/funding/research-grants/funding-opportunities/quantum-technologies-for-fundamental-physics/.

Applicants that do not register their intent to submit before the deadline will be ineligible for the call.

Rachel Reynolds, QTFP Programme Manager, QTFP@stfc.ukri.org


Nuggets:

New RHESSI Science Nuggets

from Hugh Hudson [November 6, 2019]

No. 360: “Searching SOLfully within the Nuggets”, by Hugh Hudson. Using the SOL nomenclature is a good thing.

No. 361: “Non-radial jets on the edges of active regions,” by Peter Wyper. The very common jet structures that we see can naturally combine twist and breakout.

No. 362: “Can magnetic reconnection cause solar rainstorms?” by Petra Kohutova. Impulsive heating resulting from coronal reconnection can trigger rain.

No.363: “Flare waiting times depend on their magnitudes,” by Hugh Hudson. Surprising new evidence for the build-up and release process.

We welcome contributions to the RHESSI Nuggets, and the topics may wander some distance away from specifically RHESSI results if they are generally interesting.

See http://sprg.ssl.berkeley.edu/~tohban/wiki/index.php/RHESSI_Science_Nuggets for these and others.

Comments about specific flares can be found by searching for their SOLyyyy-mm-dd identifier from this home page.

New UKSP Nugget #105

from Iain Hannah [October 22, 2019]

105. Transient inverse-FIP effect observed during a solar flare
by Deborah Baker, Lidia van Driel-Gesztelyi, David Long (MSSL) and David H. Brooks (GMU).

Can plasma composition tell us about processes occurring below the surface of the Sun?

105. Transient inverse-FIP effect observed during a solar flare

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

UKSP Nuggets are published on a monthly basis highlighting solar physics research led from the UK.

UKSP Nuggets

Iain Hannah and Lyndsay Fletcher

http://www.uksolphys.org/?p=16507


Meetings/Workshops/Summer Schools:

NASA’s “Living with a Star” Heliophysics Summer School

from Marianna Korsos [November 12, 2019]

2020 Theme: Explosive Space Weather Events and their Impacts
July 14 – 21, 2020 – Boulder, Colorado
Application Deadline: February 21, 2020

We welcome you to apply for the 2020 NASA Heliophysics Summer School. We are seeking advanced graduate students, as well as post-doctoral students, who have completed some research in the area of space physics or related fields. You will learn about the intriguing science of heliophysics as a broad, coherent discipline that reaches in space from the Earth’s troposphere to the depths of the Sun, and in time from the formation of the solar system to the distant future.

The 2020 Summer School will follow a core set of lectures on the heliophysics system including the Sun, solar wind, planetary magnetospheres and the ionosphere/ atmospheres. Lectures will focus on the physics of explosive events such as solar flares, coronal mass ejections, and geomagnetic storms and their potential impacts. Lab activities and professional development opportunities will also be included.

https://cpaess.ucar.edu/…/summer-s…/recruitment-announcement

ESPM-16 first announcement: 7-11 Sept 2020, Turin Italy

from Natasha Jeffrey [November 11, 2019]

Dear colleague,

this is the first announcement for the 16th European Solar Physics Meeting (ESPM-16) that will take place in Turin (Italy) in the period 07-11 September, 2020. The meeting will be hosted in the Aula Magna of Turin University, located in the centre of Turin.

ESPMs are organized by the Board of the European Solar Physics Division (ESPD), a joint Division of the European Physical Society (EPS) and the European Astronomical Society (EAS).

ESPMs are held every 3 years with the purpose of bringing together researchers from Europe and beyond, who are active in the theoretical and observational study of solar and solar-terrestrial phenomena.

The tentative scientific programme of ESPM-16 includes the following sessions:

Session 1: Solar Interior, Dynamo, Large-Scale Flows and the Solar Cycle
Session 2: The Solar Atmosphere: Heating, Dynamics and Coupling
Session 3: Fundamental Plasma Processes in the Solar Atmosphere: Magnetic Reconnection, Waves, Emission, Particle Acceleration
Session 4: From Radio to Gamma Rays: Near-Sun Manifestations and Triggering of Solar Flares and Coronal Mass Ejections
Session 5: Solar-Terrestrial Relations, Solar Wind, Space Weather and Space Climate

The online registration and abstract submission platforms will open on 10th February, with a deadline on 13th April 2020. The ESPM-16 Local (espm16.loc.oato@inaf.it) and Scientific Organizing Committees are currently working to secure funding that will hopefully provide limited travel and/or local support mainly to young researchers and participants from less privileged regions.

Further details related to registration fees, abstract submission, accommodation, financial support and relevant deadlines will be circulated in a second announcement and will also be posted on the meeting’s website: https://indico.ict.inaf.it/e/ESPM-16 .

We look forward to welcoming you to Turin,

The ESPM-16 LOC.

RAS Specialist Discussion Meeting on MHD Wave and Oscillations

from Jiajia Liu [November 8, 2019]

Dear colleague,

There will be a Royal Astronomical Society specialist discussion meeting on Friday, 22 May 2020.

The topic will be “MHD oscillations and waves from the photosphere to the corona”.

Discussions will take place around topics including but not limited to: ubiquitous intensity swirls in the lower solar atmosphere; transverse oscillations in magnetic loops – both in terms of solar magneto-seismology and dissipation mechanisms; Alfvén waves in the outer atmosphere; slow-mode MHD waves within coronal structures; and waves in light-walls. Talks and posters are both accepted. We also encourage speakers to highlight one or two interesting SUCs or specific observing sequences that would help to achieve your science with the upcoming 4-m class solar telescopes.

Abstract submissions will be open in January 2020.

More information at :

https://ras.ac.uk/events-and-meetings/ras-meetings/mhd-oscillations-and-waves-photosphere-corona

UK Solar Orbiter Workshop 2020 Registration Open

from Duncan H Mackay [November 5, 2019]

UK Solar Orbiter Workshop 2020 Registration Open

13-14th January 2020
University of St Andrews

Registration for the meeting is now open and details of how to register and submit an abstract can be found on the meeting webpage at:

https://solarorbiter2020.wp.st-andrews.ac.uk/.

Please note the key dates:
• Abstract submission closes : 5th December 2019
• Scientific Program announced: 15th December 2019
• Registration and payment closes: 6th January 2020
• Workshop begins: Monday 13th January 10:30am
• Workshop closes: Tuesday 14th January 4:30pm

Duncan Mackay
Chair LOC

https://solarorbiter2020.wp.st-andrews.ac.uk/

SWIMMR (Space Weather Instrumentation, Measurement, Modelling and Risk) Kick-Off meeting

from Richard Morton [October 30, 2019]

SWIMMR (Space Weather Instrumentation, Measurement, Modelling and Risk) is a £20 million, four-year programme that will improve the UK’s capabilities for space weather monitoring and prediction. There will be an emphasis on space radiation, which can affect aircraft systems, changes in the upper atmosphere, affecting communications, and surges in the current in power grids and other ground-level systems. These are significant risks to the infrastructures we rely on in daily life and are recorded in the UK’s National Risk Register.

SWIMMR will develop and deploy new instruments, models and services to support the UK space weather community and the Met Office Space Weather Operations Centre. This programme will significantly add to the UK’s capability to predict and mitigate the hazards of space weather, as well as providing a basis for wider international collaboration over the four year lifetime of the proposal and beyond.

The funding forms part of the Strategic Priorities Fund (SPF), delivered by the UK Research & Innovation (UKRI) to drive an increase in high quality multi- and interdisciplinary research and innovation. It will ensure that UKRI’s investment links up effectively with government research priorities and opportunities. The programme is a collaboration led by the Science and Technology Facilities Council (STFC) with NERC and supported by the Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy (BEIS), the Department for Transport and the Ministry of Defence. The programme has been outlined in close association with the Met Office Space Weather Operations Centre (MOSWOC).

The programme will be delivered through a series of activities managed by either STFC or NERC. The STFC funding component will be delivered via a mixture of open calls for research projects and commissioned work under standard public sector procurement rules. Both types of activity will directly help improve the ability of the Met Office to predict space weather events so as to reduce their potential impact.

Programme News
The SWIMMR kick off meeting will be held on 26th November 2019 in the Wolfson Library of the Royal Society, 6-9 Carlton House Terrace, London SW1Y 5AG, starting at 11:00 am (coffee available from 10:30 am).

Pre-registration for the event is required, as capacity is limited. To register, please use go to the Eventbrite registration page: https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/swimmr-project-kick-off-meeting-tickets-78980315249

Some more information about this programme, which will run until March 2023, is now available through the web sites of NERC (https://nerc.ukri.org/research/funded/programmes/sfp-swimmr/) and STFC RAL Space (https://www.ralspace.stfc.ac.uk/Pages/SWIMMR.aspx).

Call for Splinter Sessions for Cool Stars 21

from Miho Janvier [October 25, 2019]

Dear all,

The 21st edition of the “Cambridge Workshops of Cool Stars, Stellar Systems and the Sun” (Cool Stars 21) will be held 22-26 June 2020 in Toulouse, France.

Note to the community: Cool Stars Workshops covers, among many subjects, the science of the Sun (more information here: https://coolstars21.github.io/index.html).

The CS21 SOC invites the community to propose splinter sessions on current hot topics. Proposals for splinter sessions can be made by individuals or groups of individuals. At this time, we are planning on 9 splinter sessions of 180 minutes each to be accommodated in our schedule. The splinter organizers will have access to abstracts of potential contributions submitted on the abstract form.

Splinter organizers should be prepared to produce and maintain a website that includes the schedule and speakers, and describes opportunities for people to participate in the session. The splinter websites will be linked from the main CS21 website, so all meeting participants are aware of the splinter sessions and can make informed choices about which sessions they wish to attend. A complete program for each splinter should be online six weeks prior to the meeting, that is by May 8th, 2020 – and hopefully earlier.

Any splinter session proposal should include the following:

1 Title
2 Names of the session organizers with primary contact information; names of co-organizers if appropriate
3 Two page summary of the goal of the session, including discussion on why this is a timely and relevant topic for CS21
4 List of potential speakers, and a plan for how additional speakers will be solicited (Note that CS21 follows a “one person – one talk” rule. Plenary speakers cannot give a talk in a splinter session, nor can one person talk in more than one splinters session.)
5 Proposed Splinter format that includes a description on how the audience will be involved
6 Commitment to set up a website in support of the splinter, with a complete program online by May 8th, 2020
7 Commitment to contribute a summary of the session for the proceedings

Deadline for splinter session proposals is December 9, 2019. Please submit proposals by mailing a plain text file to cs21@irap.omp.eu with the subject line ‘Splinter Session Proposal’.
We plan to announce accepted splinter sessions by January, 10th 2020, and will provide links to your splinter session website for attendees to submit contributions to your splinter as soon as possible.
Please do not propose splinters that are too similar to the 5 main morning sessions (see the conference program) if you wish to maximise your chances of success.

https://coolstars21.github.io/index.html

SCUBA-do: in memory of Wayne Holland

from Sian Giles-Titcombe [October 25, 2019]

The Royal Observatory Edinburgh is proud to host a symposium of remembrance for UK ATC scientist Professor Wayne Holland, who sadly died of cancer on May 22nd of this year.

This will be a one-day event with talks from friends and colleagues remembering the life and work of Wayne. It will be held in the Higgs Centre for Innovation conference room at the ROE on Thursday February 13th 2020.

It is anticipated that the day will commence at 10:30 and finish by 18:00 followed by an evening dinner for those interested.

Further details, registration and talk contributions can found at https://www.roe.ac.uk/roe/staff/wsh/symposium-wsh.html.

Ian Robson, Walter Gear, Jane Greaves, Gillian Wright and Jim Dunlop

https://www.roe.ac.uk/roe/staff/wsh/symposium-wsh.html

ESWW16 Topical Discussion Meeting on big-data and modelling of solar activities and space weather forecasting

from Jiajia Liu [October 17, 2019]

There will be a topical discussion meeting on big-data and modelling of solar activities and space weather forecasting during the European Space Weather Week 2019 on 21 November (Thursday) in Liege, Belgium. We welcome all interested researchers and students to join the discussions, exchange ideas and initiate new or strengthen existing collaborations. An abstract could be found below:

Solar activities, especially eruptive events including flares, coronal mass ejections or fast changes in solar wind conditions could induce severe disturbances in the geospace environment. These interruptions could interfere with our communication systems, affect the precision of GPS services, obstruct the smooth operation of satellites and endanger the safety of astronauts. Therefore, the accurate and reliable forecasting of the eruptive solar activities is paramount important to minimize potential risk to our socio-economics.

Up to now, thanks to the fast-growing data acquisition in solar and inter-planetary space observations, large amount of observational solar data are now available. Data mining, machine learning (including artificial intelligence, AI) technologies can help researchers to i) cope with the very rapidly growing amount of observational solar data and ii) discover potential new knowledge from the big data. Furthermore, the enormous amount of solar data enables us to build new and more reliable forecasting models for solar activity prediction. This TDM is dedicated to explore the underlying data processing and modelling technics of predicting solar activities, including, but not limited to, solar data retrieval, automated detection and tracking of solar activities and the construction of solar activity prediction models.

http://www.stce.be/esww2019/program/tdm.php?nr=17


Jobs/Studentships:

Call for applications for 15 Marie Sklodowska-Curie PhDs to study Exoplanets and Planet Forming Disks

from Georgina Bennett [November 13, 2019]

‘CHAMELEON – Virtual Laboratories for Planets and Planet-forming Disks’ is an exciting new Marie Sklodowska-Curie Innovative Training Network (ITN): https://chameleon.wp.st-andrews.ac.uk/.

The overarching goal of CHAMELEON is to train a network of PhD researchers to retrieve and predict the chemical composition of planet-forming disks and exoplanet atmospheres using such Virtual Laboratories in conjunction with existing and upcoming data such as the VLT, ALMA, JWST, and ARIEL.

We are looking for 15 outstanding Early Stage Researchers (ESRs) to join the CHAMELEON ITN to study for their PhD. We offer a range of data-driven and computational modelling projects that build Virtual Laboratories by using advanced numerical and statistical methods from astrophysics, computational chemistry, laboratory and theoretical physics, geosciences, mathematics, and computer sciences.

You can apply for up to three out of the 15 positions available: https://chameleon.wp.st-andrews.ac.uk/recruitment. A common set of application materials must be submitted to the host institutes, following instructions that are described in individual adverts.

Each ESR will be appointed on a full-time, fixed-term contract for a period of three years under the ITN at a primary host institute. During their period of study, each ESR will spend a pre-defined period of time at another CHAMELEON institute (detailed in individual project adverts), which enables them to meet the eligibility requirements for dual/joint degrees. Additional time may be added to individual contracts as part of these dual/joint degrees.

Recruitment Requirements
Marie Curie eligibility rules require that ESRs have no more than four years’ research experience, counting from the date at which they have been awarded a degree that allows them to embark on a PhD. To satisfy Marie Curie mobility criteria, ESRs will not have resided or carried out their main activity (work, studies, etc.) in the country of the primary host institute for more than 12 months in the 3 years immediately prior to the start date. Short stays such as holidays and/or compulsory national service are not taken into account.

Application deadlines vary with host institution and vary between December 2019 to February 2020.

See project website for further details.
Download/Website: http://chameleon.wp.st-andrews.ac.uk/recruitment/

Sent on behalf of the project supervisors:

Dr Ludmila Carone, Max Planck Institute for Astronomy, Heidelberg, Germany
Professor Leen Decin, University of Leuven, Belgium
Dr Christiane Helling (Network lead) and Dr Peter Woitke, University of St Andrews, UK Professor Uffe Jørgensen and Professor Anja Andersen, University of Copenhagen, Denmark Professor Inga Kamp, University of Groningen, The Netherlands
Professor Katrien Kolenberg, University of Antwerp, Belgium
Professor Paul Palmer, University of Edinburgh, UK
Dr Michiel Min, SRON, The Netherlands
The University of Edinburgh is a charitable body, registered in Scotland, with registration number SC005336.

Tenure-Track Faculty Position in Theoretical Solar Physics at New Jersey Institute of Technology, USA

from Wenda Cao [November 12, 2019]

The Physics Department at New Jersey Institute of Technology (NJIT) is seeking candidates for a tenure-track faculty position at the assistant or associate professor level in Theoretical Solar Physics with an anticipated start date in Fall 2020.

We are recruiting a modeler who can develop an independent research program and collaborate with the other faculty members in the department and the Center for Solar-Terrestrial Research. The preference will be given to candidates who will carry out MHD or other modeling involving the data from the 1.6-meter Goode Solar Telescope (GST) at Big Bear Solar Observatory, as well as achieve discovery science in understanding solar activity in high resolution. NJIT has built and now operates the largest aperture and highest-resolution GST in the world. The research can further be advanced in anticipation of the operation of 4-meter DKIST. The successful candidate is expected to teach both undergraduate and graduate courses, as well as develop new courses in areas of solar-terrestrial physics, space weather, and plasma physics.

Applicants should have a Ph.D. in Astronomy, Physics, Astrophysics, Space Physics, or closely related areas, with excellent oral and written communication skills, and successful research experience as demonstrated by accomplishments, publications, and research grants.

Please submit all documents online by December 31st, 2019 at

https://njit.csod.com/ats/careersite/JobDetails.aspx?site=1&id=1801

including: (1) a cover letter, (2) a current version of your curriculum vitae, (3) five-year research plan, (4) documentation of teaching experience and teaching philosophy and (5) three letters of recommendation. Inquiries should be addressed to Chair of the Search Committee, Prof. Wenda Cao, NJIT Physics Department (wcao@bbso.njit.edu).

New Jersey Institute of Technology is an equal opportunity/affirmative action employer with a strong commitment to diversity and inclusion. We do not discriminate on the basis of race, color, religion, sex, age, national origin, sexual orientation, gender identity or expression, disability, veteran status, marital status, or any other legally protected status. Applications by members of all underrepresented groups are encouraged.

Two permanent positions in Applied Mathematics at Glasgow

from David MacTaggart [November 6, 2019]

Please follow the link:

https://www.jobs.ac.uk/job/BWM309/lecturer-senior-lecturer-reader-applied-2-posts-available

for two permanent positions at Glasgow in Applied Mathematics. Candidates with strong research records in MHD (theoretical and modelling aspects) would be very welcome.

Yours sincerely,
David MacTaggart

Total Solar Irradiance instrument scientist

from Louise Harra [November 4, 2019]

Total Solar Irradiance (TSI) is the energy input to Earth (per square meter of the Earth’s cross section) and any longterm variation of TSI will directly translate into a change of the terrestrial climate. PMOD/WRC has been building and operating instruments which measure the TSI on spacecraft. Among them are the oldest still operational TSI radiometers of the VIRGO package on board the SOHO (ESA/NASA) spacecraft. New TSI radiometers will be launched on the PROBA3 (ESA) and FY-3E (China Meteorological Administration) missions in the 2019/2020 time frame.

The TSI instrument scientist role involves scientific planning and operations, calibration, crossfacility coordination leading to research in the mission data. The position can start from November 2019, and will be for one year in the first instance

https://www.pmodwrc.ch/en/2019/10/29/postdoc-vacancy-tsi-instrument-scientist/

Lindemann Trust Fellowships 2020-2022

from Natasha Jeffrey [October 30, 2019]

Accepting applications until 3rd February 2020

Now extended to two years!
Research Fellowship to the US for post-doctoral scientists
$50,000 per year, with a £1000 travel grant

For more information, visit www.esu.org/lindemann

The Lindemann Trust, in partnership with the English-Speaking Union, offers up to five 2-year fellowships, each worth $50,000 a year for postdoctoral scientists to carry out research in the USA. I would be very grateful if you could make the below information available to your students and encourage them to apply.

The Lindemann Trust Fellowships are awarded to graduates of exceptional promise in both the pure and applied physical sciences who have shown capacity for producing original research. These Fellowships enable postdoctoral scientists to pursue research in the USA without financial difficulty, and without being obliged to take up paid employment.

The Lindemann Trust supports research in the fields of:

– Astronomy
– Biophysics
– Chemistry
– Engineering
– Geology
– Geophysics
– Mathematics
– Physics

To be eligible to apply, candidates must meet the following criteria:
– Hold British, Irish or Commonwealth citizenship AND be normally resident in the UK
– Either be in the final stages of your doctoral studies at a UK university, or have completed a doctorate at a UK university within the last three academic years

The deadline for applications is Monday, 3rd February 2020.

Please visit www.esu.org/lindemann for more information where applicants can also see our Notes for Applicants for full details on the fellowships and application process.

NSF Supported Tenure-Track Assistant Professor in Solar Physics and Astro-informatics at Georgia State University, Atlanta, GA, USA

from Manolis Georgoulis [October 28, 2019]

The Department of Physics and Astronomy at Georgia State University (GSU) is seeking to fill a tenure-track faculty position by Fall 2020 at the assistant professor level.

We are looking for a solar physicist with significant expertise in both the MHD of the solar corona and flares and in Big Data and Machine Learning, along with a desire to enhance GSU’s solar physics and big data curriculum, with a focus on minority and female education and mentoring. The new hire will join our Astro-informatics Cluster, a close collaboration between the solar/stellar physics and remote sensing for space sciences groups in the Department of Physics and Astronomy, and the Computer Science department at GSU. Our Cluster is currently focused on space weather forecasting and is looking to merge two techniques (numerical simulations (SIM) and Machine Learning (ML)) into a fully integrated approach for data-driven solar physics research and space weather prediction. With our new hire the Cluster will achieve the critical mass needed to succeed in this initiative.

This position is funded for the first five years through NSF’s prestigious Faculty Development in the Space Sciences (FDSS) program. NSF support includes summer salary, travel, publications, and graduate student support. Upon the awarding of tenure in the fifth year GSU further supports the faculty line.

Georgia State University, an enterprising R-1 university is located in the heart of downtown Atlanta, a vibrant international city in the Southeast. GSU enrolls and graduates one of the most diverse student bodies in the nation and advances innovative research by building a diverse faculty. We encourage applications from women and members of underrepresented groups in the physical sciences.

Applicants should have the following basic qualifications: 1) Ph.D. in astronomy, physics, or closely related field, 2) postdoctoral research experience, 3) evidence of the ability to establish and maintain a successful research program, 4) evidence of the motivation and ability to teach at the undergraduate and graduate levels with a diverse student body, 5) evidence of the ability and clear desire to work in a large, collaborative effort (i.e. the Cluster).

Applications should include 1) a CV, including a publication and grant list, 2) a statement of the candidate’s research interests and how the research fits into the above program, 3) a statement of teaching experience and philosophy, and 4) contact information for at least three references. All materials should be sent via email to martens@astro.edu. Questions regarding the position can be addressed to Dr. Piet Martens at the same email address. Applications received by December 15, 2019, will receive full consideration. An offer of employment will be conditional on background verification. Georgia State University is an Equal Opportunity Employer and does not discriminate against applicants due to race, ethnicity, gender, veteran status, or on the basis of disability or any other federal, state or local protected class.

Tenure-Track Faculty Position in Theoretical Solar Physics at New Jersey Institute of Technology, USA

from Wenda Cao [October 28, 2019]

The Physics Department at New Jersey Institute of Technology (NJIT) is seeking candidates for a tenure-track faculty position at the assistant or associate professor level in Theoretical Solar Physics with an anticipated start date in Fall 2020.

We are recruiting a modeler who can develop an independent research program and collaborate with the other faculty members in the department and the Center for Solar-Terrestrial Research. The preference will be given to candidates who will carry out MHD or other modeling involving the data from the 1.6-meter Goode Solar Telescope (GST) at Big Bear Solar Observatory, as well as achieve discovery science in understanding solar activity in high resolution. NJIT has built and now operates the largest aperture and highest-resolution GST in the world. The research can further be advanced in anticipation of the operation of 4-meter DKIST. The successful candidate is expected to teach both undergraduate and graduate courses, as well as develop new courses in areas of solar-terrestrial physics, space weather, and plasma physics.

Applicants should have a Ph.D. in Astronomy, Physics, Astrophysics, Space Physics, or closely related areas, with excellent oral and written communication skills, and successful research experience as demonstrated by accomplishments, publications, and research grants.

Please submit all documents online by December 31, 2019 at https://njit.csod.com/ats/careersite/JobDetails.aspx?site=1&id=1801 including: (1) a cover letter, (2) a current version of your curriculum vitae, (3) five-year research plan, (4) documentation of teaching experience and teaching philosophy and (5) three letters of recommendation. Inquiries should be addressed to Chair of the Search Committee, Prof. Wenda Cao, NJIT Physics Department (wcao@bbso.njit.edu).

New Jersey Institute of Technology is an equal opportunity/affirmative action employer with a strong commitment to diversity and inclusion. We do not discriminate on the basis of race, color, religion, sex, age, national origin, sexual orientation, gender identity or expression, disability, veteran status, marital status, or any other legally protected status. Applications by members of all underrepresented groups are encouraged.

Research Assistant/Associate in Solar Physics and Space Science

from Viktor Fedun [October 25, 2019]

Applications are invited for a Research Assistant/Associate to work on to contribute to development of numerical tool for analysis plasma flows observed in observational and synthetic solar data.

The post provides a rare opportunity to contribute to development of numerical tool for analysis plasma flows observed in observational and synthetic solar data. Plasma flows in the Sun’s photosphere have the potential to excite a wide range of magnetohydrodynamic waves and may have a prominent role in both direct and alternating current models of solar atmospheric heating. These flows have traditionally been identified by intensity feature tracking, primarily by visual inspection. This post focuses on software development for automated coherent structure detection in the Sun’s atmosphere. The proposed tool for development will be used to identify the location and specific classes of velocity fields e.g., vortex, saddle point, shear flow etc. and will also be able to quantify the parameters that govern, e.g., the observed radial dependence of the velocity as function of distance from sources and sinks.

The following method(s) for analysis will be used: Proper Orthogonal decomposition (POD), Dynamic Mode Decomposition (DMD), Lagrangian-averaged vorticity deviation (LAVD), Machine Learning & Artificial Intelligence.

The successful candidate should have Masters or PhD degree in any relevant area of applied (pure) mathematics, physics, control, computing science.

The applicant will join an internationally-renowned research group in plasma physics (astrophysical and laboratory) and data analysis, and will contribute to the reputation of Automatic Control and Systems Engineering Department, the University of Sheffield, UK as the leading department in systems and control (Rank 1st in REF 2014 for Research Output).

The post is suitable for either a Research Assistant (Grade 6) or Research Associate (Grade 7) depending on the successful applicant’s skills, experience and qualifications. Candidates appointed at Grade 7 must have a PhD (or be close to completion) and have research experience in solar data processing.

To apply, please, follow this link:
https://jobs.shef.ac.uk/sap/bc/webdynpro/sap/hrrcf_a_posting_apply?PARAM=cG9zdF9pbnN0X2d1aWQ9Mzc1MDlCNkFBMDJFMUVFOUJEOTQ0MDMyQzUxNDhDODEmY2FuZF90eXBlPUVYVA%3d%3d&sap-client=400&sap-language=EN&sap-accessibility=X&sap-ep-themeroot=%2fSAP%2fPUBLIC%2fBC%2fUR%2fuos#

Alternatively, contact Dr Viktor Fedun (v.fedun@sheffield.ac.uk) and Dr Gary Verth (g.verth@sheffield.ac.uk).

https://jobs.shef.ac.uk/sap/bc/webdynpro/sap/hrrcf_a_posting_apply?PARAM=cG9zdF9pbnN0X2d1aWQ9Mzc1MDlCNkFBMDJFMUVFOUJEOTQ0MDMyQzUxNDhDODEmY2FuZF90eXBlPUVYVA%3d%3d&sap-client=400&sap-language=EN&sap-accessibility=X&sap-ep-themeroot=%2fSAP%2fPUBLIC%2fBC%2fUR%2fuos#

Solar Orbiter SPICE and EUI instrument scientist at PMOD/WRC

from Louise Harra [October 23, 2019]

Solar Orbiter is designed to understand how the Sun influences its environment by the creation and propagation of solar wind into interplanetary space. Solar Orbiter will be close enough to the Sun to sample this solar wind shortly after it has been ejected from the solar surface, while at the same time observing in great detail the process accelerating the wind on the Sun’s surface. It will be launched on 5th February 2020 from Cape Canaveral. The instrument scientist role involves scientific planning and operations, calibration, cross-facility coordination leading to research in the mission data. The position can start from November 2019, and will be for one year in the first instance.

The position is based at PMOD/WRC (https://www.pmodwrc.ch) in Davos. Founded in 1907, PMOD/WRC is concerned with the study of solar radiation and its effect on the Earth’s climate. PMOD/WRC has been involved in space instrumentation since the 1980s. It has been involved in the build of two instruments on the Solar Orbiter mission – the Extreme-Ultraviolet Imager (EUI) and the Spectral Imaging of the Coronal Environment (SPICE). EUI is a suite of imaging telescopes to observe the solar atmosphere, and SPICE is an imaging spectrometer.

Person specification: it is expected that the candidate will have a PhD in solar physics or a related area.

Application process: candidates should send a cover letter, curriculum vitae (including a publication list), and a brief (< 1 page) summary of their expected research program with Solar Orbiter. Please send your application to PMODWRC Office Team Team-Office@pmodwrc.ch.

The deadline for applications is 11th November 2019.

Further details are given below. If you have any questions regarding the job, then contact Louise Harra at louise.harra@pmodwrc.ch

PMOD/WRC is an equal opportunity employer.

Postdoctoral position (IAC Tenerife) – Diagnostics of the Solar Atmosphere Within the Stellar Context

from Natasha Jeffrey [October 21, 2019]

The Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias (IAC, Tenerife) invites applications for a post-doctoral position to work within the project “Diagnostics of the solar atmosphere within the stellar context” led by María Jesús Martínez González and Iñigo Arregui. The position is for 2 years, starting on January 1st, 2020 (or as soon as possible thereafter).

The successful candidate is expected to conduct research on one or more of the following themes:

– Diagnostics of solar/stellar chromospheric structures using spectropolarimetry
– Bayesian analysis for the study of the structure, dynamics and heating of the solar corona
– Development of new data analysis and inversion tools based on deep learning

The successful candidate must have experience in one or more of the following aspects:

– Observational and/or theoretical research on the diagnostics of the structure and physical processes in the solar atmosphere and its stellar context
– Application of inversion tools to solar/stellar spectropolarimetry, solar atmospheric seismology, stellar Doppler tomography
– Experience in the use of deep learning tools

Applications must be sent electronically using the online application form at http://research.iac.es/jobs/

Alternatively, you may follow the instructions given in the corresponding official advertisement on our website
https://www.iac.es/en/employment/un-contrato-postdoctoral-diagnostico-de-la-atmosfera-solar-2019one-postdoctoral-contract-diagnostics-solar

The following documentation must be sent in a single PDF file:

– Filled and signed application form (Annex I) including the corresponding name and code of the offered post offered.
– Copy of national identity card or passport.
– CV, containing list of publications
– Report on past research activity and statement on suitability for the position (not exceeding 2 pages)
– Copy of the Doctoral degree or certified proof of being in possession of a doctorate (in Spanish or English)

The deadline for applications is 15th November 2019.

For more information contact Maria Jesús Martínez González (marian@iac.es) or Iñigo Arregui (iarregui@iac.es).