Last 32 days

General News/UKSP Business:

Meetings/Workshops/Summer Schools:

Jobs/Studentships:

Nuggets:


General News/UKSP Business:

UKSP Business Meeting 13th July 14:00-15:00

from Natasha Jeffrey [July 1, 2020]

Dear Colleagues,

The UKSP Council will hold a virtual UKSP Business Meeting at 14:00-15:00 on the 13th July.

Further details regarding the agenda and the meeting link will be provided next week.

Kind regards,
UKSP Council

The National Physics PhD Student Network

from Harneet Sangha [July 1, 2020]

The National Physics PhD Student Network, in collaboration with the Institute of Physics, aims to bring PhD students in Physics together in a friendly, social environment, to support each other, raise concerns and share positivity. It has been created by two PhD students, and it aims to be a space for PhD students to connect, be supported and gain strength in numbers. We had our first ‘lunch and natter’ session over zoom on Monday 29 June at 1pm, with discussion topics including introductions and finding out how everyone has been coping with Covid-19. The organisers have also created a Slack workspace for everyone who is interested in joining this National Student Network – all PhD students in Physics and related fields are welcome!

Feel free to spread the word – if you want invite links to the Slack workspace, please contact Manika Sidhu at mks32@leicester.ac.uk and she’ll send them your way! Don’t worry if you want to get involved but didn’t attend the first zoom meet up, they’ll be hosting regular meetings in the future.

If you have any questions, feel free to contact Harneet Sangha (hs372@leicester.ac.uk) or Manika Sidhu (mks32@leicester.ac.uk).

Increasing BAME Representation & Inclusion in Geosciences: a Call to Action

from Natasha Jeffrey [June 26, 2020]

A group of postgraduate students at the University of Oxford have put together an action plan for increasing the representation and inclusion of BAME individuals (those from ethnic minorities) in the Earth and Planetary Sciences. This report, together with the department response, will be launched on Monday 29 June at 4pm. All are welcome to come along to find out more about the 42 concrete actions proposed, and the processes involved (both from a departmental and student perspective) for the purposes of copying these across to other institutes.

Signup link here: https://bit.ly/2Nrt1Ui, for questions contact benjamin.fernando@seh.ox.ac.uk

Obituary for Nigel Weiss

from Natasha Jeffrey [June 26, 2020]

From:
Prof. Mike Proctor FRS,
DAMTP, University of Cambridge
Provost of Kings College

———————–

Prof Nigel Weiss FRS (1936-2020)

Nigel Weiss, who died earlier this week after a fall at his home, was born
on 16 December 1936, in South Africa. He was educated at Hilton College,
Natal, then Rugby School and Clare College Cambridge.He began his research
career studying seismic tremors, supervised by Edward Bullard, but switched
to the study of magnetohydrodynamics. After a spell at Culham Laboratory,
during which time he pioneered the use of stable numerical codes for
solving MHD problems, he was the first to demonstrate the mechanism of flux
expulsion by rotating eddies. He then came to Cambridge as a lecturer in
DAMTP, and a Fellow of Clare. He became a world authority on the physics of
sunspots, and mechanisms driving the 22 year solar cycle. He made important
contributions to the study of the nonlinear dynamics of convection, and led
a long term programme to understand the interaction of compressible
convection and magnetic fields. He became a Professor at Cambridge in 1987
and was elected to the Royal Society in 1992. He served as President of the
Royal Astronomical Society from 2000-2002, and received the Society’s
highest honour, the Gold Medal, in 2007. Apart from his academic work, he
was a member of the National Gallery Scientific consultative group from
1996-2012.

Nigel’s cheerful and generous approach to his subject will be much missed
by his many former students and colleagues, both in Britain and around the
world. He leaves his wife Judy, a son and two daughters and five
grandchildren.

Condolence messages can be sent to Helen Mason (hm11@damtp.cam.ac.uk).

A new Science Vision and Infrastructure Roadmap for European Astronomy

from Natasha Jeffrey [June 19, 2020]

A new Science Vision and Infrastructure Roadmap for European Astronomy

Work is underway to develop a new, combined Science Vision and Infrastructure Roadmap, looking at the next 20 years of European astronomy, building upon the previous versions & updates delivered by Astronet (Science Vision, Infrastructure Roadmap). It is planned to publish this in early 2021.

Astronet is a self-funded, consortium of European funding bodies and associates, established for the purpose of providing advice on long-term planning and development of European Astronomy. Its members include most of the major European astronomy nations, with associated links to the European Space Agency, the European Southern Observatory, the Square Kilometre Array and the European Astronomical Society, among others. Astronet is keeping APPEC, and other bodies representing the full breadth of astronomical research, informed.

The purpose of the Science Vision and Infrastructure Roadmap is to deliver a coordinated vision for the next 20 years, covering the entire breadth of astronomical research, from the origin and early development of the Universe to our own solar system and all associated research facilities and techniques.

Working groups, each with around 8 members from a range of countries, gender and career status, have been established and tasked with developing the Science Vision and Infrastructure Roadmap.

These are organised around the research themes:
· Origin and Evolution of the Universe
· Formation and evolution of galaxies
· Formation & Evolution of Stars
· Formation & Evolution of Planetary Systems
· Understanding the solar system and conditions for life

but will include other cross-cutting aspects such as computing and training and interdisciplinary studies.

Astronet will be seeking input from the community and from associated areas, such as particle astrophysics, in the coming months. Information will be posted on the Astronet website

Astronet also aims to provide an update of the project at the European Astronomical Society annual meeting on June 30.

Contact
Malcolm Booy – malcolm.booy@stfc.ukri.org
Kamalam Vanninathan – kamalam.vanninathan@stfc.ukri.org

SunPy 2.0 Released

from Sophie Murray [June 15, 2020]

The SunPy Project is happy to announce the release of SunPy 2.0! SunPy is an open-source Python library for Solar Physics data analysis and visualization. With this release, the 1.0 and 1.1 releases will no longer receive bug fixes and we encourage everyone to upgrade to 2.0. More information can be found here: https://docs.sunpy.org/en/stable/whatsnew/2.0.html 

Some highlights for this release include updates to the Fido data search and retrieval tool, various fixes to the sunpy.map sub package, and integration of differential rotation into the sunpy.coordinates framework. Also new in SunPy 2.0 is the aiapy package for analyzing data from SDO/AIA, which replaces aiaprep.

If you have any questions about the release do get in touch with the project team (https://sunpy.org/help), we always welcome feedback!

The next UK-SOSS talk will be held on 16th of June, 2020, 11:00 am (UK time)

from Marianna Korsos [June 8, 2020]

The 4th seminar will be held on 16th of June, 2020, 11:00 am (UK time)
Speaker: Prof Mitchell Berger (University of Exeter)
Title: Magnetic helicity: decompositions and methods of localization
Zoom link: https://zoom.us/j/95338171418
Meeting ID 953 3817 1418

Abstract:
Magnetic helicity is an ideal MHD invariant; it measures geometric and topological properties of a magnetic field. The talk will begin by reviewing helicity and its mathematical properties. It can be decomposed in several ways (for example, self and mutual helicity, Fourier spectra, field line helicity, linking, twist, and writhe). The talk will also review methods of measuring the helicity flux, as well as applications in solar and stellar astrophysics.
I will then discuss some new developments in measuring localized concentrations of helicity in a well-defined, gauge invariant manner, using wavelets.

—————————————————————————————————–
You can subscribe to the UK-SOSS newsletter on this link:
https://www.jiscmail.ac.uk/cgi-bin/webadmin?SUBED1=UK-SOSS&A=1

The UK-SOSS is supported by Aberystwyth University and Queen’s University Green Fund

Marianna Korsos, JiaJia Liu and Chris Nelson


Nuggets:

New EIS Science Nugget

from Deb Baker [July 1, 2020]

We are pleased to post our latest EIS Science Nugget entitled ‘Quantifying the Departure from Maxwellian:  Active Region and Quiet Sun’ by Juraj Lorincik, Jaro Dudik, Giulio Del Zanna, Elena Dzifcakova and Helen Mason.  The link to the nugget is here:

http://solarb.mssl.ucl.ac.uk/SolarB/nuggets/nugget_2020june.jsp

The nugget archive is located here:

http://solarb.mssl.ucl.ac.uk/SolarB/eisnuggets.jsp

We welcome contributions from the community.  Please contact Deb Baker (deborah.baker at ucl.ac.uk).

New UKSP Nugget #110

from Iain Hannah [June 26, 2020]

110. Flare/CME Cartoons
by Hugh Hudson, Nicolina Chrysaphi and Norman Gray (Glasgow)

A brand-new version of the grand archive.

http://www.uksolphys.org/?p=17716

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

UKSP Nuggets are published on a monthly basis highlighting solar physics research led from the UK.

http://www.uksolphys.org/uksp-nuggets/

Iain Hannah and Lyndsay Fletcher

http://www.uksolphys.org/?p=17716

RHESSI Nuggets in June 2020

from uksp_nug2 [June 25, 2020]

No. 380: “Energy Transport by Accelerated Particles in the Quiet Solar Atmosphere”, by Lars Frogner, Boris Gudiksen, and Helle Bakke. A first study of non-thermal particles integrated into an MHD simulation of the solar atmosphere.

No. 381: “Extreme Ultraviolet Late Phase of Solar Flares”, by Rui LIU. Both arcade and circular-ribbon flares may sometimes spawn EUV late phase emission.

We welcome contributions to the RHESSI Nuggets, and the topics may wander some distance away from specifically RHESSI results if they are generally interesting. See http://sprg.ssl.berkeley.edu/~tohban/wiki/index.php/RHESSI_Science_Nuggets for these and others. Comments about specific flares can be found by searching for their SOLyyyy-mm-dd identifier from this home page.

New RHESSI Science Nuggets

from Hugh Hudson [June 12, 2020]

No. 380, “Energy transport by accelerated particles in the quiet solar atmosphere,” by Lars Frogner, Boris Gudiksen, and Helle Bakke. A first study of non-thermal particles integrated into an MHD simulation of the solar atmosphere. Click the title to read more.

We welcome contributions to the RHESSI Nuggets, and the topics may wander some distance away from specifically RHESSI results if they are generally interesting. See http://sprg.ssl.berkeley.edu/~tohban/wiki/index.php/RHESSI_Science_Nuggets for these and others. Comments about specific flares can be found by searching for their SOLyyyy-mm-dd identifier from this home page.


Meetings/Workshops/Summer Schools:

UKSP Specialist Discussion Day 30th July: Abstract Deadline 7th July and Confirmed Speakers

from Natasha Jeffrey [July 1, 2020]

With the absence of NAM this year, the UKSP council will hold a one-day online meeting covering all aspects of solar physics, but with particular emphasis on promoting the work of early career researchers and PhD students.

http://www.uksolphys.org/resources/uksp-specialist-discussion-day-30th-july/

The meeting will be held on the 30th July and it will cover three sessions:

  1. Open session on solar physics

***Confirmed invited speakers: David Kuridze (Aberystwyth University) and Lauren Doyle (Armagh Observatory).***

In this session we welcome all contributions describing advances relating to physical processes occurring from the interior to the outer atmosphere, based on space- or ground-based observations, simulations or theory.

  1. Sun-Heliosphere session

***Confirmed invited speakers: Stephanie Yardley (University of St Andrews) and David Stansby (UCL MSSL).***

This session will discuss the connections between the Sun and the heliosphere: in-situ and remote-sensing observations, and related theory and modelling work, including contributions that discuss results from Parker Solar Probe and Solar Orbiter.

  1. Online poster Session covering all solar/heliosphere topics.

………………..

Contributed talks from early career researchers and PhD students from across the UK will be given priority. While preference will be given to early career researchers/PhD students for oral presentations, no such restriction is applied to our online poster session.

If you would like to present your work at the meeting please send your abstract to A.S.Hillier@exeter.ac.uk by 7th July using the following form:

Name:

Affiliation:

Career Stage:

Title:

Abstract:

Collaborators:

Preferred Session (1, 2 or 3):

More details regarding online platforms will be announced soon.

We look forward to seeing you online on the 30th July!

UKSP council on behalf of the meeting SOC.

SOC:

Mykola Gordovskyy (Manchester)

David Long (UCL)

Karen Meyer (Dundee)

Huw Morgan (Aberystwyth)

UKSP council

Fall AGU – Space Weather Research and Forecasting: End-User Requirements and Future Modelling Capabilities – FIRST ANNOUNCEMENT

from Mario M. Bisi [June 30, 2020]

Dear All.

This is our first call for contributed abstracts to our co-convened SH and SM (and SA, NH, and P cross-listed) SWIRLS Extreme Events & Hazards session “Space Weather Research and Forecasting: End-User Requirements and Future Modelling Capabilities” at the upcoming ‘mostly virtual’ Fall AGU with some on-site attendance in San Francisco, CA, 07-11 December 2020 (https://www.agu.org/fall-meeting).

The FINAL abstract-submission deadline is 29 July 2019 2020 at 11:59 P.M. EDT / 30 July 2020 at 03:59UT (see: https://www.agu.org/Fall-Meeting/2020/Present/Abstracts) for full details on abstract submissions).

To submit your abstract, please go here: https://agu.confex.com/agu/fm20/prelim.cgi/Session/103517.

The full session details are below. To submit, the first author must be the submitting author and must be an AGU member. First authors are allowed to submit one contributed abstract, or one contributed abstract and one invited abstract, or two invited abstracts to the science sessions. You can also submit one abstract to certain exempt sessions separately without counting towards this quota. You can also be presenting author on multiple abstracts.

Please note that this session is being organized as one of the alternate-format sessions which will likely include oral talks, panelists, and posters (depending on the final Fall AGU Virtual setup).

This is further a follow-on from previous years which have included very-active poster sessions, good interactions at talks, and excellent audience participation at the panel session.

Best wishes, and thanks,

Mario (on behalf of all the session Convenors).

Session ID#: 103517

Session Description:
Society’s growing reliance on advanced technology means an increasing vulnerability to space weather impacts. To effectively mitigate the effects of space weather on critical infrastructure, we must evaluate developing models, instruments, and data-products in terms of: (i) Current requirements, and (ii) Advancements above the status quo that blue-sky investigations can provide.

In this year’s session, the sixth incarnation since 2015, the panel will focus on addressing end-users’ requirements. Fully engaging the end-user in the Research to Operations and Operations to Research (R2O2R) process is critical in achieving capabilities and end-products that best suit users’ needs. Example panel questions are: what advancements are required to develop reliable physics-based predictions of major solar eruptions at least 24 hours in advance? How can we best address power-grid operator requirements for CME forecasts five days in advance?

For this session, we welcome contributions on all aspects of space weather, including novel physics-based modelling concepts.

Primary Convener: Mario M. Bisi, UKRI STFC Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, RAL Space, Harwell Campus, Didcot, United Kingdom.
Co-Conveners: Antti A. Pulkkinen, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD, United States; Michele D. Cash, NOAA Space Weather Prediction Center, Boulder, CO, United States; and Suzy Bingham, Met Office, Exeter, United Kingdom.

Co-Organized between:
SPA-Solar and Heliospheric Physics (SH), and SPA-Magnetospheric Physics (SM)

Cross-Listed:
SA – SPA-Aeronomy
NH – Natural Hazards
P – Planetary Sciences

SWIRL Themes:
Extreme Events & Hazards

Index Numbers:
4323 – Natural Hazards: Human impact
7934 – Space Weather: Impacts on technological systems
7959 – Space Weather: Models
7999 – Space Weather: General or miscellaneous

https://agu.confex.com/agu/fm20/prelim.cgi/Session/103517

ESWW2021 Poster/Logo Competition is now OPEN!

from Mario M. Bisi [June 30, 2020]

Dear Colleagues.

This is an invitation to design and create a logo/poster for the for the 17th European Space Weather Week (ESWW17/ESWW2021) Poster Competition.

Although, due to the COVID-19 pandemic, we have postponed the ESWW from November 2020 to October 2021, we feel that it is still appropriate and important to keep some of the normal ESWW activity going to ensure that ESWW2021 remains a key focus for the global Space Weather community. Of course, the additional benefit of going ahead with the Logo/Poster competition is that the winning design will have a much longer exposure period on the website and on social media platforms and therefore may be of even greater benefit to the winning designer this time around.

Our design theme this year is: “Global Partnership for the Space Weather Sector”, and our panellists will be announced in due course on the competition website: http://esww17.iopconfs.org/competition – where the full details of how to enter and what is expected and required for your entry.

The deadline for submissions through the website is 16th August 2020 – no other methods of entry will be accepted.

The selected image will be used on the following conference material:

• Website, programme, on site posters and banners, presentations and other ESWW branded items where possible.
• Additionally, the designer wins the D4T medal which gives free access to ESWW2022 (ESWW18)

Full terms and conditions of the entry can be found at the website noted above.

Thanks in advance for your entries, and we look forward to welcoming you to Glasgow in October 2021.

Best wishes,

Mario (sent on behalf of Barbara-Ann Curran, ESWW2021 LOC Chair)

Dr Mario M. Bisi
ESWW2021 PC Chair
ESWW2021 LOC Vice Chair

http://esww17.iopconfs.org/competition

European Space Weather Symposium 2020 (ESWS2020) – Save The Date Announcement

from Mario M. Bisi [June 30, 2020]

Dear Colleagues.

We would like to draw your attention to an upcoming online meeting, the first European Space Weather Symposium (ESWS) which will take place the same week as ESWW2020 would have occurred, 02-06 November 2020. The meeting, known as ESWS2020, will be entirely virtual to the space weather community around the globe and will be run over the Zoom platform. Further details will follow in due course.

For now, please save the date in your calendars and look out for further announcements and updates throughout early northern-hemisphere Summer 2020.

We are looking forward to seeing you, virtually, 02-06 November 2020 on Zoom.

Best wishes,

Mario.

Dr Mario M. Bisi
ESWS2020 PC Chair
ESWS2020 OOC Vice Chair
On behalf of the ESWS2020 PC and OOC

STFC-funded summer school on Solar-Stellar Connection

from Anne-Marie Broomhall [June 30, 2020]

Registration is now open for an STFC-funded summer school on the Solar-Stellar Connection.

The summer school will run online between 14th-18th September 2020. Registration is free and the deadline to register is 31st August 2020.

More details can be found here: https://warwick.ac.uk/stellar_school

Our summer school aims to cover topics from solar and stellar interiors, through solar/stellar atmospheres, and out into interplanetary space and the interactions between stars and planets.

The schedule can be found here: https://warwick.ac.uk/stellar_school/schedule

For more information contact Anne-Marie Broomhall: a-m.broomhall@warwick.ac.uk

warwick.ac.uk/stellar_school

RHESSI Virtual Workshop 2020

from Natasha Jeffrey [June 30, 2020]

The agenda for, and instructions for WebEx log in to, the 2-day Virtual RHESSI Workshop on July 7-8, 2020, from 11:00 a.m. to 2 p.m. Eastern Daylight Time each day, are now posted on the website at

https://agenda.infn.it/event/20574/page/5462-virtual-meeting-2020

We look forward to seeing you (at least virtually!)

Gordon Emslie and Melissa Pesce-Rollins

2020 AGU – Preparing for Solar Cycle 25: Recent Successes, Current Challenges and Next Steps in Solar Flare Modelling

from Natasha Jeffrey [June 30, 2020]

The 2020 AGU Fall Meeting is going to be mostly virtual (https://www.agu.org/fall-meeting).

A session relevant to the UKSP community, on the topic of solar flare modelling (https://agu.confex.com/agu/fm20/prelim.cgi/Session/104016), is described below.

Abstracts are solicited that discuss any aspect of flare modelling, model-data comparisons, or observations that present challenges to models.

The meeting will take place 7-11th December 2020. Abstract submission is now open, and will close on 29th July 2020.

Any questions about this session can be directed to graham.s.kerr@nasa.gov.

Title: “Preparing for Solar Cycle 25: Recent Successes, Current Challenges and Next Steps in Solar Flare Modelling”

Summary: “Solar flare models have improved significantly in recent years, and have been used to investigate all aspects of the flare process, from reconnection and energy release, to energy transport, and the formation of the radiation that characterizes flares. Despite these advances, achieving consistency with certain observables is still beyond our current capabilities. As we approach solar cycle 25, and in anticipation of high-quality flare observations from the DKIST, BBSO, Solar Orbiter, and other sources, it is vital that we make concerted efforts to identify the major limitations in models and work towards improvements. We invite contributions that discuss flare modelling, including: recent advances, the innovative use of existing models, bridging the gap from 1D to 3D, specific challenges, model-model and model-data comparisons, and future development. Contributions can focus on both loop or global modelling, and can cover different aspects of energy release, and energy, radiation or mass transport in flares.

ESWW2021 New Dates!

from Mario M. Bisi [June 24, 2020]

Dear Colleagues.

Having re-arranged the dates for the 17th European Space Weather Week in Glasgow twice already, firstly because of the COP 26 Climate Change Meeting and then as a result of the on-going COVID-19 pandemic, we have to change the dates again because of the re-arranged COP 26 Climate Change Meeting: https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-scotland-glasgow-west-52814996.

Therefore, the 17th European Space Weather Week (ESWW2021) is now scheduled for 25th-29th October 2021: http://esww17.iopconfs.org/

We continue to look forward to welcoming you to Glasgow in 2021 for ESWW2021.

All the best,

Mario
ESWW PC Chair
ESWW LOC Vice Chair

http://esww17.iopconfs.org/

UKSP Specialist Discussion Day 30th July: First announcement and call for abstracts

from Natasha Jeffrey [June 15, 2020]

With the absence of NAM this year, the UKSP council will hold a one-day online meeting covering all aspects of solar physics, but with particular emphasis on promoting the work of early career researchers and PhD students.

The meeting will be held on the 30th July and it will cover three sessions:

  1.  Open session on solar physics

In this session we welcome all contributions describing advances relating to physical processes occurring from the interior to the outer atmosphere, based on space- or ground-based observations, simulations or theory.

2.   Sun-Heliosphere session

This session will discuss the connections between the Sun and the heliosphere: in-situ and remote-sensing observations, and related theory and modelling work, including contributions that discuss results from Parker Solar Probe and Solar Orbiter.

3.   Online poster session covering all solar/heliosphere topics.

Each oral session will be led by an invited talk from an early career researcher, followed by contributed talks with contributions from early career researchers and PhD students from across the UK given priority. While preference will be given to early career researchers/PhD students for oral presentations, no such restriction is applied to our online poster session.

If you would like to present your work at the meeting please send your abstract to A.S.Hillier@exeter.ac.uk by 7th July using the following form:

Name:
Affiliation:
Career Stage:
Title:
Abstract:
Collaborators:
Preferred Session (1, 2 or 3):

More details regarding the meeting website and online platform will be announced soon.

We look forward to seeing you online on the 30th July!

UKSP council on behalf of the meeting SOC.

SOC:
Mykola Gordovskyy (Manchester)
David Long (UCL)
Karen Meyer (Dundee)
Huw Morgan (Aberystwyth)
UKSP council

REGISTRATION NOW OPEN STFC Introductory Solar System Plasmas Summer School 2020

from Natasha Jeffrey [June 8, 2020]

https://www.birmingham.ac.uk/research/activity/physics/astronomy/stfc-intro-2020/index.aspx

Registration for this year’s introductory School, which will be delivered online, is now open. To register, please visit:
https://www.birmingham.ac.uk/research/activity/physics/astronomy/stfc-intro-2020/registration.aspx

Registration is free for all delegates.

The School will provide young researchers with introductory lectures covering the key areas and latest results from across the discipline, with core content agreed by the UK Solar Physics (UKSP) and Magnetosphere, Ionosphere and Solar-Terrestrial (MIST) communities. Additional material and added-value content beyond the core subjects will this year focus on two areas: first, the new opportunities afforded by the application of machine learning and artificial intelligence, and advanced statistical analysis techniques; and second, a session on the “solar-stellar connection” and the importance of solar-system studies in a wider context (e.g. for the characterisation and study of exoplanets).

Details of the programme may be found at:
https://www.birmingham.ac.uk/research/activity/physics/astronomy/stfc-intro-2020/programme.aspx

Contact information is at:
https://www.birmingham.ac.uk/research/activity/physics/astronomy/stfc-intro-2020/contact.aspx

Bill Chaplin, on behalf of the LOC
(w.j.chaplin@bham.ac.uk)


Jobs/Studentships:

Final announcement: Research Fellow in Solar Physics (2 vacancies) – Deadline July 5th

from Richard Morton [June 30, 2020]

Applications are invited for two separate four-year (53 month) postdoctoral research fellow positions in the area of Solar Physics; to be hosted at Northumbria University, UK.

The successful candidates will conduct research relevant to understanding how Alfvénic waves transfer energy through the Sun’s atmosphere, with a particular focus on the corona and the connection with the solar wind. These positions are funded by a Future Leader grant from UKRI (the RiPSAW project, MR/T019891/1) and you will work primarily with Dr Richard Morton (PI). RiPSAW focuses on both the observation of the Alfvénic waves and modelling of their turbulent cascade. You will initiate, develop and conduct high-quality research in support of the project.

The two positions offer the opportunity for regular travel to international conferences and collaborators. There will also be a strong focus on the professional and personal development of the appointed staff, with substantial resources available for training of the successful candidates (including attending workshops, courses, etc).

Both fellows would also be expected to contribute to the general development of the research group, supporting each other’s research and mentoring PhD, Masters, undergraduate and summer students. The positions also require engagement with the project’s public outreach and communication activities.

For informal enquiries about this post please contact Dr Richard Morton, UKRI Future Leader Fellow, at richard.morton@northumbria.ac.uk .

Further details on the roles and how to apply are available here: https://www.northumbria.ac.uk/work-for-us/job-vacancies/academic-3188-research-fellow-in-solar-physics

Deadline for applications is the 5th July 2020.

Postdoctoral Research Associate/Assistant in Astrophysical Fluid Dynamics (Newcastle University)

from Marianna Korsos [June 30, 2020]

Postdoctoral Research Associate/Assistant in Astrophysical Fluid Dynamics (Newcastle University)

Closing date for applications: 26 July 2020

We are looking to appoint a postdoctoral research associate/assistant to work with Dr Paul Bushby and Dr Toby Wood at Newcastle University. The project is concerned with the evolution of magnetic buoyancy instabilities in the solar interior, focusing particularly upon the impact that such instabilities have upon the generation of large-scale magnetic fields in the Sun.

This fixed term position is funded by the Leverhulme Trust, with funding available for up to three years.

Salary: £28,331 – £32,817

For informal enquiries, please contact Dr Paul Bushby (paul.bushby@ncl.ac.uk)

https://jobs.ncl.ac.uk/job/Newcastle-Research-AssistantAssociate-in-Astrophysical-Fluid-Dynamics/606680601/

Research Fellow in Solar Physics (2 vacancies) – Northumbria University, UK

from Richard Morton [June 10, 2020]

Applications are invited for two separate four-year (53 month) postdoctoral research fellow positions in the area of Solar Physics; to be hosted at Northumbria University, UK.

The successful candidates will conduct research relevant to understanding how Alfvénic waves transfer energy through the Sun’s atmosphere, with a particular focus on the corona and the connection with the solar wind. These positions are funded by a Future Leader grant from UKRI (the RiPSAW project, MR/T019891/1) and you will work primarily with Dr Richard Morton (PI). RiPSAW focuses on both the observation of the Alfvénic waves and modelling of their turbulent cascade. You will initiate, develop and conduct high-quality research in support of the project. Research fellow positions are expected to begin on the 1st October 2020

The first of the available positions will be related to the analysis of EUV data from the Solar Dynamics Observatory and infrared data from the Coronal Multi-Channel Polarimeter, along with data coming from DKIST, PSP and SolO. The position will require experience with data from remote sensing instrumentation, and a good knowledge of standard methodology required for typical data analysis tasks. The ideal candidate will also have a good knowledge of statistical data analysis, with some experience in the analysis of MHD waves and/or machine learning. Competence in IDL, Python or R is essential. Experience in numerical modelling of MHD waves would also be beneficial but not essential. This aspect of the project will involve working closely with collaborators at HAO, NCAR and include the opportunity for extended visits.

The second of the available positions will be related to the analysis of infrared data from the Coronal Multi-Channel Polarimeter and DKIST, along with numerical and forward modelling of MHD waves in the corona. The position will require experience with data analysis and/or numerical simulations of MHD waves. The ideal candidate will have experience in both of these domains, with knowledge of either MHD wave simulations or Alfvénic Turbulence modelling. A working knowledge of IDL, Python or R is also desirable. This aspect of the project will involve working closely with collaborators at Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Harvard, and include the opportunity for extended visits.

The two positions offer the opportunity for regular travel to international conferences and collaborators. There will also be a strong focus on the professional and personal development of the appointed staff, with substantial resources available for training of the successful candidates (including attending workshops, courses, etc).

Both fellows would also be expected to contribute to the general development of the research group, supporting each other’s research and mentoring PhD, Masters, undergraduate and summer students. The positions also require engagement with the project’s public outreach and communication activities.

For informal enquiries about this post please contact Dr Richard Morton, UKRI Future Leader Fellow, at richard.morton@northumbria.ac.uk .

Further details on how to apply are available here: https://www.northumbria.ac.uk/work-for-us/job-vacancies/academic-3188-research-fellow-in-solar-physics

Deadline for applications is the 5th July 2020.