Recent News Summary

General News/UKSP Business

Nuggets

Meetings/Workshops/Summer Schools

Jobs/Studentships


General News/UKSP Business

  • Astronomy Grants Round Guidelines and Closing Date 2022
    Dear Colleagues This is a note to advise that the closing date for the 2022 Astronomy Grants Round is 1st March 2022. Submissions will be accepted from 2nd December 2021. The Astronomy Guidelines for Applicants have been revised and will be made available on the relevant funding opportunity at  Opportunities – UKRI However due to the delay in finalising and publishing the guidelines, a PDF version is attached (Astronomy Guidelines to Applicants 2022). Please be advised there have been a number of revisions so Applicants are advised to read the guidelines in detail and contact the office with any queries ahead of submission. Some key points:
    • Publication table is no longer a requirement, please do not submit one. Applicants should address track record in the case for support
    • Gantt Charts are no longer a requirement, please do not submit one
    • Impact – an additional page is permitted within the case for support to address Impact planning. Please note this is a mandatory requirement.
    New groups submitting their first consolidated grant proposal or those considering a consortium proposal should contact the office with an outline of the projects they wish to submit. This provides the office the opportunity to provide advice prior to submission. If you have any queries please see the contact details below: Chloe Woodcock (chloe.woodcock@stfc.ukri.org) – Senior Programme Manager for AGP Kim Burchell (kim.burchell@stfc.ukri.org) – Head of Astronomy Awards
  • Two UKSA opportunities – Mars Science AO and Call for members of Space Exploration Advisory Committee
    Space Exploration Advisory Committee (SEAC) We are looking for new members of the exploration science committee with a deadline of 10 Jan 2022. We have an announcement live here – https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/space-exploration-advisory-committee-call-for-membership-nominations-2022 Mars Science AO We also have a live AO call to support Mars Science with a deadline of 1 Feb 2022 – https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/2022-mars-science-announcement-of-opportunity?utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=govuk-notifications&utm_source=31015717-d659-4597-ae28-cd596a89544b&utm_content=immediately
  • Solar Physics journal welcomes Inigo Arregui
    Introducing our new Editor-in-Chief to succeed Michael Wheatland Publisher and editors of the journal Solar Physics welcome Iñigo Arregui, who is taking over the responsibilities of Editor-in-Chief from Michael Wheatland, who has served on this post from 2016–2021. We gratefully acknowledge Michael Wheatland’s contributions to Solar Physics and the community as a whole. Iñigo Arregui is joining the continuing Editors-in-Chief Lidia van Driel-Gesztelyi, John Leibacher, and Cristina H. Mandrini. Iñigo Arregui completed his PhD in 2003 and has been a researcher at the Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias (IAC) since 2012. He has conducted research in Spain (Universitat de les Illes Balears and Instituto de Astrofisica de Canarias) and Belgium (K.U. Leuven). He also had visiting professor positions at ISAS/JAXA (Japan) and K.U. Leuven. His research interests are focused on the magnetic structuring of the solar atmosphere, MHD waves in coronal structures, coronal seismology, coronal wave heating, and the application of Bayesian inference methods. The publisher would like to thank all researchers who have applied for the open position as Solar Physics EiC, and also the Solar Physics Advisory Board who formed a selection committee that made recommendations to the publisher. https://www.springer.com/journal/11207/updates/19913462
  • Next UK-SOSS talk – 9th December 2021
    Dear all, I have the pleasure of bringing your attention to the next UK-SOSS talk which will take place at 10am on 9th December 2021 (GMT). Our speaker will be Prof. Eduard Kontar from University of Glasgow. The title, abstract, and zoom link are below. I look forward to seeing you there. Jiajia Liu (on behalf of Marianna Korsos and Chris Nelson) Speaker: Prof. Eduard Kontar Title: New look at the Sun at radio-frequencies Zoom link: https://zoom.us/j/95338171418 Observations of the Sun at radio-frequencies provides unique look at a variety of solar processes: from solar activity to the solar corona turbulence studies. Over the last few years, a unique set of solar radio observations with unprecedented temporal and frequency resolutions using the Low Frequency Array (LOFAR), Solar Parker Probe and RPW/Solar Orbiter opened new opportunities for detailed studies of the variety of solar processes in the outer solar corona. The new observations at sub-second scales are often intriguing and puzzling, requiring new models and re-thinking of the current models. In the talk, I will highlight these new observations and exciting opportunities with the Square Kilometre Array which is under construction. https://solarphysics.aber.ac.uk/uk-soss.php
  • European Solar Physics Division (ESPD) Prizes
    European Solar Physics Division (ESPD) 2022 PhD Thesis and Early Career Researcher Prizes Deadline: February 6th, 2022 Since 2017, the European Solar Physics Division (ESPD) of the European Physical Society (EPS) awards two prizes every year: the ESPD PhD Thesis Prize, and the ESPD Early Career Researcher (Postdoc) Prize. These prizes are nomination-based. The deadline for nomination is February 6th, 2022. The 2022 ESPD PhD Thesis Prize will be awarded to a young researcher whose PhD thesis viva took place in 2021. The 2022 ESPD Early Career Prize will be awarded to a young researcher whose PhD was awarded after 01/012018 (with possible extension). ESPD aspires to be an inclusive and welcoming environment for all who enjoy solar physics. In order to promote the gender equality in science, ESPD strongly encourages the nomination of young female solar physicists. Further information about eligibility, documents to be included in the nomination package, and submission process for each prize can be found on the ESPD prizes webpage: https://www.eps.org/members/group_content_view.asp?group=85203&id=641304 The ESPD Prize Committee

Nuggets

Meetings/Workshops/Summer Schools

  • COSPAR-22 E2.5: Abundance Variations and Fundamental Questions in Solar and Stellar Physics
    You are cordially invited to submit an abstract for our session COSPAR-22 E2.5: ABUNDANCE VARIATIONS AND FUNDAMENTAL QUESTIONS IN SOLAR AND STELLAR PHYSICS. This session is part of the COSPAR 2022 44th Scientific Assembly to be held in Athens, Greece from 16-24 July 2022. The abstract deadline is 11 February 2022. Session Description: Element abundance patterns have long been used as diagnostics of physical processes in many areas of astrophysics. Work in recent decades has revealed that the solar coronal composition varies with location, time and magnetic activity compared to the photosphere. Stellar coronae and winds also show a range of composition differences from their photospheres. We propose a session devoted to discussion in a synergistic manner of the implications of variable element abundances throughout the Sun and stars and their winds. We encourage contributions from the solar and stellar astrophysical communities on a variety of topics including: Observations and models of the FIP and Inverse FIP effects and the impact of wave physics on our understanding of coronal abundances; the effects of flaring on short term modulation and of spots on long term, cyclic modulation of abundances in solar and stellar coronae and winds; connection of coronal abundances and stellar dynamos. Confirmed invited speakers: David B. Jess (Queen’s University Belfast, UK and California State University Northridge, USA) Heidi Korhonen (European Southern Observatory, Chile) Martin Laming (Naval Research Laboratory, USA) Balint Seli (Konkoly Observatory, Hungary) Brian Wood (Naval Research Laboratory, USA) Abstract submission and meeting details can be found here: https://www.cosparathens2022.org Session details can be found here: https://www.cospar-assembly.org/admin/session_cospar.php?session=1082 Deb Baker UCL/MSSL On behalf of the E2.5 SOC
  • Final reminder: abstract submission deadline for RAS Specialist Discussion Meeting on ‘3D structure of the flare chromosphere”
    Abstract submission deadline is this week on Friday 26 November. https://ras.ac.uk/events-and-meetings/ras-meetings/3d-structure-flare-chromosphere
  • EGU2022 | Session ST1.6: The neutron monitor network: challenges and future perspective
    Dear Colleagues, We would like to invite you to participate and submit an abstract to the upcoming EGU General Assembly Session ST1.6: The neutron monitor network: challenges and future perspective. Submission link: https://meetingorganizer.copernicus.org/EGU22/session/43643 Deadline for abstract submission: January 11, 2022 Deadline for financial support: December 01, 2021 Description: Since the late 1950’s the neutron monitor (NM) network provides continuous measurements of the cosmic ray (CR) environment, shading light upon the physical mechanisms of solar relativistic ion acceleration, injection and propagation during Ground Level Enhancements (GLEs), as well as the effect of large scale structures (i.e. interplanetary coronal mass ejections – ICMEs and corotating interaction regions – CIRs) propagating in the solar wind resulting in short-term decreases of galactic cosmic rays (GCRs), termed as Forbush decreases (FDs) and the long-term behavior of CRs. Since 2008, the majority of NMs provide data through, the Neutron Monitor Database (NMDB), making it straightforward for the scientific community to retrieve such data. The NM network has paved the way for the understanding of the near-Earth and the inner heliosphere radiation environment and corroborates with the findings of spacecraft missions, specifically recent measurements of high energy particles from PAMELA, AMS onboard the International Space Station and EPHIN onboard SOHO. At the same time, the network of NMs is extensively used for the establishment of space-weather related services, such as alerts of GLEs and estimations of the radiation environment within the atmosphere, the magnetosphere and beyond. Also, new detectors and electronics expand the current NM network whereas algorithms for the treatment of the data are being investigated. With a view to the future, the NM network faces challenges with respect to its sustainability, evolution, continuous and updated usage by the scientific community. Nonetheless, the future perspectives of the network are promising, with the NM data being used in a large variety of fields – even non-conventional ones. This session brings together scientists from research fields related to space, solar, cosmic-ray, heliospheric and atmospheric sciences. The session solicits contributions related but not limited to: • Modeling of GLEs, short term FDs and GCRs modulation; • Long-term variability of the CR flux from ground-based and spacecraft measurements; • Evaluation and quantification of the radiation environment in the inner heliosphere and the Earth’s atmosphere; • Space-weather services based on the NM network; • Influence of solar activity and the effect of cosmic rays on the terrestrial environment; • Instrumentation, algorithms and data access for ground-based CR detectors. Conveners Athanasios Papaioannou, Ilya Usoskin, Cristian T. Steigies, Alex Mishev, David Ruffolo
  • Call for abstracts for AOGS2022
    ST02 Solar Magnetic Field and Small-scale Eruptions 05-10 June 2022 Honolulu, Hawaii Small-scale eruptions are ubiquitous on the Sun. Based on their different sizes, dominant temperatures, and wavelengths they are observed, they have been given different names including spicules, macro-spicules, micro-jets, jets, bright-points, camp-fire, etc.. These small-scale eruptions have often been found to be accompanied or associated with different solar magnetic field phenomena. Since the first modern observations of these small-scale eruptions in the solar atmosphere, the understanding of those eruptions has been advanced greatly, thanks to the development of MHD and plasma-astrophysics theories, the improvement in computational powers, and to the realization of a number of state-of-the-arts observational facilities with high spatial and spectral resolution and cadence. We welcome presentations about small-scale eruptions. We encourage contributions about a variety of research methodologies, including the application of techniques drawn from other disciplines. We hope to see submissions ranging from observations and theory to numerical, statistical, and machine learning modeling, in order to foster collaborations across communities. You are cordially invited to the next AOGS annual meeting. The abstract submission deadline is: 10 January 2022. To submit the abstract to our session, pls proceed via https://www.asiaoceania.org/aogs2022/public.asp?page=submit_abstracts.asp SOC of ST02, AOGS2022 Jie Chen (NAOC), Marianna B Koros (Aberystwyth), Yang Guo (Nanjing), Robertus Erdelyi (Sheffield)
  • 2022 Sun-Climate Symposium – May 16-22 – Call for Abstracts
    2022 Sun Climate Symposium Please mark your calendar today to join us in Madison, Wisconsin, May 16-20, 2022! Our focus topic for this 3.5-day symposium is “Improved Climate-Record Reconstructions from Solar Variability and Earth System Observations” Climate studies require records of longer duration than most direct individual measurements provide. These records can be created by combining measurements from different observers, sites, or instruments. Correlations between various measurements similarly enable extending climate-data records over the long timescales needed. Such reconstructions enable lengthier indicators of the climate itself as well as the natural and anthropogenic influences on climate. We explore such reconstructions and the understanding that can be gained from them, with emphasis on links between climate influences – particularly the natural driver provided by solar variability – and the Earth-climate system. These studies include improvements in recent and upcoming climate, atmosphere, and radiative observations and models, as those are often the most accurate tie points of historical reconstructions; correlations between various records used as proxies for historical reconstructions, as those provide the long-duration records needed for climate studies; new methodologies for extending or combining records; and studies of the climate variability associated with these records. For information and to submit your abstract: https://lasp.colorado.edu/home/meetings/2022-sun-climate-symposium/

Jobs/Studentships

  • PhD positions at the University of Oslo, 2022
    The Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences of the University of Oslo announces a special MSCA-Cofund Ph.D. programme in computational sciences. In 2022, 16 Ph.D. students will be accepted, of whom two will do their Ph.D. theses within computational astrophysics. The programme starts with 3 months’ intensive joint training in computational methods, before the students will spend the rest of the 3-year programme at different departments, to do a strongly computational research project in their department. Through the three-year programme, the students will also participate in three joint workshops, and they will for a period of one to three months be on secondment to other academic or commercial institutions. Prospective students must fulfil all requirements (academic and language) for being admitted as Ph.D. students in the Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences. Applicants cannot have been resident in Norway for more than 12 months in the 3 years immediately before the date of recruitment. The Ph.D. students will receive a salary of NOK 491 200 – 534 400 per annum depending on qualifications and seniority. Application deadline is 1st of February, 2022. For further information and link to application portal, see: https://www.mn.uio.no/compsci/english/ The applicants must in their application specify which research project they will choose. The possible projects in astrophysics are: Interpretation of solar observations, using Deep Learning: https://www.mn.uio.no/compsci/english/phd_programme/projects/astronomy/solar-observations.html WholeSun: New codes and frameworks for exascale computing for multi-scale simulations: https://www.mn.uio.no/compsci/english/phd_programme/projects/astronomy/wholesun-new-codes-and-frameworks-for-exascale.html
  • DiRAC Innovation Placement
    This is an exciting opportunity for a PhD student or postdoc to work for 6 months on code development for a space weather project. In this project, a tool will be created for solar flare forecasting. To be more precise, a code will be developed that will take solar magnetogram observations (of magnetic field emerging into the solar atmosphere) as input and calculate a series of measures related to the topology of the solar magnetic field. Particular signatures of these measures will be used for flare forecasting and compared to other satellite data. The code, and associated documentation, will be used in cutting-edge solar physics and space weather research. It will also help to facilitate collaborations between research groups and national and international stakeholders in space weather. Full details relating to the position can be found at https://dirac.ac.uk/innovation-placements/ (scroll down to find the description under the University of Glasgow logo). For any enquiries, please feel free to contact me (david.mactaggart@glasgow.ac.uk). The deadline for applications is 5pm on Monday the 6th of December 2021. Best wishes, David MacTaggart http://www.maths.gla.ac.uk/~dmactaggart/index.html
  • Brinson Postdoctoral Fellowship
    We invite applications for a 3-year prestigious postdoctoral position from The Brinson Foundation starting September 1, 2022 at the National Solar Observatory, Boulder, USA. Review of applications will begin on January 7, 2022 and will continue until the position is filled. The goal of this position is to improve our understanding of solar active region magnetic structure before and during solar eruptions. To address this goal the candidate will assist with analysis of active region observations taken with space and ground-based observatories, including the Daniel K. Inouye Solar Telescope (DKIST), Solar Orbiter (SO) and Parker Solar Probe (PSP), and the development and performance of data-driven numerical simulations of solar eruptions. This position is a unique opportunity that will bridge expertise of groups with internationally leading competence in areas of active region simulations and space and ground-based observations at the National Solar Observatory (headquarters of DKIST), High Altitude Observatory (HAO) and University of California, Berkeley (UC Berkeley). The candidate will participate in collaborative and independent solar physics research, present results at scientific meetings, publish articles in peer-reviewed scientific journals and participate in outreach activities during the Total Solar Eclipse, 2024. APPLICATION DEADLINE: January 7, 2022 or until filled. QUESTIONS: Please email Maria D. Kazachenko (maria.kazachenko@colorado.edu) More information and the application link can be found at: http://solarmuri.ssl.berkeley.edu/~kazachenko/kazachenko_brinson.html
  • Instrument Scientist Position at Big Bear Solar Observatory
    New Jersey Institute of Technology (NJIT) is seeking an instrument scientist for the development of next-generation imaging spectrometer and polarimeter at Big Bear Solar Observatory (BBSO). The BBSO operates the 1.6-meter Goode Solar Telescope (GST) with a diverse suite of instrumentation. The GST with its state-of-the-art adaptive optics, imaging spectrometers and polarimeters, is a world-class facility for high spatial and temporal resolution solar astronomy in the optical/infrared. The BBSO is operated as a remote laboratory of NJIT’s Center for Solar Terrestrial Research (CSTR). The position is anticipated to start in early 2022. Applicants should have a Ph.D. or M.S. in Astronomy, Physics, Astrophysics, Space Physics, or closely related areas, with an ability to work and live at an elevation of 2000 meters. The ideal candidate will have experience of astronomical optical instrumentation with preferred working knowledge of
    • Solar polarization measurements, data processing and inversion.
    • Polarization calibration for telescope and instrumentation.
    • Fabry-Pérot interferometer imaging system.
    • High-resolution imaging spectroscopy and polarimetry data processing and analysis.
    • Observations with ground-based solar telescopes.
    The deadline for applications is December 31, 2021. Please submit all documents online at https://njit.csod.com/ux/ats/careersite/1/home/requisition/3455?c=njit including: (1) a cover letter, (2) a current version of your curriculum vitae, and (3) names of two references. Inquiries should be addressed to BBSO Director, Prof. Wenda Cao (wenda.cao@njit.edu). New Jersey Institute of Technology is an equal opportunity/affirmative action employer with a strong commitment to diversity and inclusion. We do not discriminate on the basis of race, color, religion, sex, age, national origin, sexual orientation, gender identity or expression, disability, veteran status, marital status, or any other legally protected status. Applications by members of all underrepresented groups are encouraged.
  • 2 Postdoctoral research fellowships at the Rosseland Centre for Solar Physics at the University of Oslo (deadline 30th November 2021)
    2 Postdoctoral research fellowships are available at the Rosseland Centre for Solar Physics, Institute of Theoretical Astrophysics, University of Oslo. The fellowship period is 3 years. The fellowships are connected to the projects “Impact of small-scale reconnection events on the solar atmosphere” (project PI: Luc Rouppe van der Voort) and “ORCS: Oscillations in the Realistic Corona of the Sun” (project PI: Petra Kohutova) funded by the Research Council of Norway. The application deadline is November 30, 2021. More information and application procedure: https://www.jobbnorge.no/en/available-jobs/job/214378/postdoctoral-research-fellow-in-solar-physics