Recent News Summary

General News/UKSP Business

Nuggets

Meetings/Workshops/Summer Schools

Jobs/Studentships


General News/UKSP Business

  • STFC Small Awards Applications – 12th March 2024
    Dear Colleagues A reminder that if you are planning on submitting an application to the STFC Astronomy Small Awards opportunity we advise that you begin the submission process early this year in order to account for additional time it may take on the new UKRI Funding Service. The PDF guidance for applicants can be found here: Astronomy awards guidance for applicants – UKRI The UKRI Funding finder information is as follows: Solar and planetary 2024 – https://www.ukri.org/opportunity/solar-and-planetary-small-awards-2024/ Astronomy observation and theory 2024 – https://www.ukri.org/opportunity/astronomy-observation-and-theory-small-awards-2024/ Applicants are advised that there is no functionality to return for amendment on the new service and therefore applications that do not follow the guidance will be rejected on receipt. Please pay particular attention to the Ethics and responsible research question box. You need to provide an answer to: What are the ethical or RRI implications and issues relating to the proposed work (addressing the three bullets)? As well as the three additional trusted research questions. Applications which fail to answer all 4 run the risk of being rejected. Kind regards The Astronomy Awards Team
  • Contribute and Shape Our UKSP Nuggets
    As the name suggests, a nugget, like a lump of gold, is a small piece of valuable material. Traditionally, UKSP nuggets primarily acted to summarise published research papers—which is certainly useful— however, going forward we would like to revise what a nugget can be. Whilst summarising recently authored papers is the most common subject matter, these brief articles can also be used to share more general information on topics relevant to solar physics in the UK. For example, one could treat their nugget as a short review of recent discoveries, publicising new missions or datasets, advancements in analytical and computational techniques, solicitations for collaborations on topics, or perhaps just an interesting solar event that you think should garner more attention from the community. To summarise: Nuggets should be a way to spark discussion and share ideas within the community, therefore we would like to broaden the scope of what a UKSP nugget can be. We warmly invite community members of all levels of seniority to publish and share information on any relevant topic, no matter the scale. Please feel free to get in touch with Matthew Lennard (mglennard1@sheffield.ac.uk) or Ryan Milligan (r.milligan@qub.ac.uk).
  • New GPU eCSE software development call and associated Early Career Observer call
    Dear Colleague, GPU eCSE call We are delighted to announce a new programme of eCSE calls focussing on GPU-based software development. We invite proposals to develop software that facilitates research targeted at UKRI’s digital research infrastructure e.g. future Exascale supercomputing services, UK national AI services, national Tier-2 HPC services. The call is open to research across all of UKRI’s remit. The first GPU eCSE call (GPU-eCSE01) opened on the 17 Jan 2024. The final deadline for proposal submission is 16:00 on 19 Mar 2024 via the ARCHER2 SAFE. Please note that for this call there is no separate technical evaluation stage or separate technical evaluation form. Funding will enable the employment of an RSE (a Research Software Engineer, PDRA or equivalent) to work specifically on the relevant software to enable new features or improve the performance of the software to be run on GPU-based architectures. Funding can be requested for up to 36 person months of effort per project for a duration of up to 2 calendar years. There is flexibility in the way the effort is requested. For example, a project may have more than one person working on it or the effort could be spread over a greater number of calendar months, i.e. a staff member could work on the project at less than 100% alongside other commitments or it could be worked on by a staff member who doesn’t work full time. Please just get in contact with the ARCHER2 Service Desk (support@archer2.ac.uk ) if you wish to discuss possible scenarios. Projects are expected to start between 2-6 months after a call closes. Funding can be requested for staff located at the institution of the PI, third parties, or can include staff from the ARCHER2 centralised CSE support team at EPCC or a mixture of the above. Projects may utilise the GPU component of ARCHER2 or other suitable GPU resources to complete the technical work. If the proposal plans to use the GPU component of ARCHER2, successful projects will be given access to these resources. If projects plan to utilise other systems, you should ensure you have suitable resources available to complete the project successfully. Please contact and arrange this access with the relevant service provider before submission. Researchers with codes in the DiRAC or STFC remit can get access to DiRAC GPU services via seedcorn. Please contact diracseedcorn@jiscmail.ac.uk by the end of February if you wish to get access DiRAC GPU services for this eCSE call. More details of how to apply are available by following the link to the eCSE calls page from here: https://www.archer2.ac.uk/ecse/ Early Career Observer call The eCSE Panel Meeting is the meeting where eCSE proposals are reviewed and decisions are made on which proposals to fund. As part of our commitment to encouraging and developing Early Career Researchers, we are offering a small number of places to such researchers to attend the eCSE panel meeting as Early Career Observers. The aim is to give Early Career Researchers a better insight into this competitive selection process, to assist them in the preparation of future funding proposals. The deadline for applying to attend the panel meeting as an observer is 16:00 on 27 Feb 2024 via the ARCHER2 service desk, and details of the call are given here: https://www.archer2.ac.uk/ecse/observers/ An insight into the experience from one of our recent Early Career Panel Observers can be found here:https://www.archer2.ac.uk/news/2023/01/18/ecse-ec-obs.html eCSE and observer call dates Deadline for final GPU eCSE submission: 16:00 on 19 Mar 2024 (via the ARCHER2 SAFE https://safe.epcc.ed.ac.uk/ Deadline for Early Career eCSE Panel Observers call: 16:00 on 27 Feb 2024 (via the ARCHER2 service desk support@archer2.ac.uk ) Best wishes, Chris Johnson The University of Edinburgh is a charitable body, registered in Scotland, with registration number SC005336. Is e buidheann carthannais a th’ ann an Oilthigh Dhùn Èideann, clàraichte an Alba, àireamh clàraidh SC005336.
  • STFC Education, Training, Careers News
    The Education, Training and Careers Committee (ETCC) met on 28 November 2023. The main items on the agenda were: an update on Collective Talent Working; an update from STFC Science Board; ED&I Statements for Fellowships; Short Courses and Summer Schools 2023 and 2024. ETCC welcomed Professor James McLaughlin as the interim chair, and new member Dr Cosimo Inserra. Collective Talent Working ETCC noted the recent UKRI update on Collective Talent Funding. The Collective Talent initiative aims to build on the collaborative working across the Councils previously and ensure that the talent landscape is less complex for the UKRI community. The initiative covers studentships and fellowships and is a long-term programme of change. From January 2024 there will be two award types rather than the numerous ones currently across Councils. These will be Doctoral Landscape Awards, which will cover the current STFC Doctoral Training Partnerships (DTPs) and Doctoral Focal Awards, which will cover the current STFC Centres for Doctoral Training (CDTs). Discussions on collective awards to cover the STFC Industrial CASE awards are continuing. Update from STFC Science Board ETCC gave an update to Science Board at the September meeting. The update included an overview of ETCC and the main current challenges. ED&I Statements for Fellowships The 2022 Fellowship Review panel recommended the collection of ED&I statements from departments submitting Ernest Rutherford Fellowship applications. This was to assess the inclusivity of the selection processes and to develop best practice. ETCC noted the received statements and discussed recommendations for future best practice. Short Courses and Summer Schools 2023 and 2024 Bids had been received for 14 Short Courses and Summer Schools 2024. The Committee recommended the following for funding:

    • Advanced Cosmology and Extragalactic School (ACES) • Artificial Intelligence and Astronomy with Public Engagement • British Universities Summer School in Theoretical Elementary Particle Physics (BUSSTEPP) • Data Analysis Workshop • HEP Instrumentation School • High Energy Physics • Introductory Astronomy • Introductory Course in Solar and Solar-Terrestrial Physics • NExT PhD Workshop • Nuclear Physics Summer School • Planetary Surfaces Summer School

    The pdf version of the report can be found here. Further publicity ahead of the next call will be issued shortly.
  • The upcoming award deadlines
    The Royal Astronomical Society’s Keith Runcorn Thesis Prize This is awarded annually and recently finished PhD students from UKSP disciplines are eligible. Deadline: 31st January. Note: To be eligible the thesis needs to have been approved between 31st January 2023 and 31st January 2024; Nominees do not have to be RAS members. Further info: https://ras.ac.uk/awards-and-grants/awards/2277-keith-runcorn-thesis-prize The Royal Society medals and awards Deadline: 23rd February. Note: You do not need to be a fellow to nominate or be nominated. Further info: https://royalsociety.org/grants-schemes-awards/awards/nomination-guidance/ https://royalsociety.org/grants-schemes-awards/awards/

Nuggets

Meetings/Workshops/Summer Schools

  • Call for abstracts – Interconnection between the Sun, space weather and the atmosphere
    Dear colleagues, Please consider submitting an abstract to the session UP2.8: “The interconnection between the Sun, space weather and the atmosphere” at the annual European Meteorological Society (EMS) meeting, this year at the University of Barcelona, 2-6 Sept 2024. Information for this hybrid meeting: Thank you for your consideration – we look forward to seeing you in Spain! With best wishes, Mauro Messerotti, Consuelo Cid, Suzy Bingham Session information: The interconnection between the Sun, space weather and the atmosphere The Sun is the main energy source for the Earth’s atmosphere. The main manifestations of external forcing from space to the atmosphere are in variations in solar parameters such as the solar irradiance (including solar UV) and solar particle fluxes. These parameters can induce changes in the atmosphere both at local and global scales, and can influence over a large range of altitudes up to the thermosphere. Some of these changes have the potential to affect the troposphere through atmospheric coupling processes, particularly through the stratosphere-troposphere connection, and thus have the potential to influence weather and climate. The field of space weather, that is the change in the environment between the Sun and the Earth, has seen a rapid increase in research activity in recent years and in associated large scientific advances. The weather and climate community can benefit from this via better representation of space weather effects and their associated impacts on the atmosphere. The overarching goal of this session is to connect communities within the Sun-to-Earth system and in so doing promote Sun-to-Earth system science, products and services. The aim is to review the state-of-the-art and to identify possible interrelationships between Earth and the Sun and space weather by assessing the level of coupling in the relevant physical systems and processes. Contributions from the following topics (but not exclusively) are welcome:
    •  Upper atmospheric dynamical variability and coupling between atmospheric layers e.g. thermosphere-ionosphere coupling
    • Solar irradiance and energetic particle impacts on the atmosphere
    •  Solar variations and stratosphere-troposphere coupling
    • Solar influence on climate variability
    •  Solar irradiance (spectral and total irradiance) variations
    • Sun-Earth and Sun-planet interrelationships (of relevance to e.g. spacecraft for planetary exploration which require planet meteorology forecasts)
    • Space weather observation, forecasting products and services.
  • Selected Venues for European Space Weather Week 2025 and 2026
    The European Space Weather Week (ESWW) Programme Committee (PC) is pleased to announce the selected host cities for ESWW in the years 2025 and 2026. The 2025 edition will take place in Umeå, Sweden. The 2026 edition will take place in Firenze (Florence), Italy. These will be the first occasions when these two countries with prominent space weather communities host the event and each will add their own unique flavour to the conference. The ESWW PC is hoping to make an announcement for the host city for 2027 soon. ESWW 2024 will take place in Coimbra, Portugal from 4th – 8th November 2024. The community is encouraged to routinely check the website for updates: https://esww2024.org/
  • 2024 DASH/IHDEA meeting: 14-18 October (call for session topics)
    Calling all software developers and scientists who are interested in algorithms, software and data systems related to heliophysics (solar physics, space physics, geospace and related sciences)! Come see what your colleagues are working on! Mark your calendars! 14-18 October 2024, at the European Space Astronomy Centre (ESAC) of ESA, near Madrid, Spain and hybrid: DASH (Data Analysis and Software in Heliophysics) and IHDEA (International Heliophysics Data environment Alliance) annual meetings More information at https://www.cosmos.esa.int/web/ihdea/ihdea-dash-2024 where we invite you to submit session topics for DASH by March 18 at ihdea_dash_2024@cosmos.esa.int! The European Space Agency (ESA) is pleased to host the venue of the upcoming DASH (Data Analysis and Software in Heliophysics) and IHDEA (International Heliophysics Data Environment Alliance) annual meetings in its premises at ESAC. Oct. 14-16: DASH serves as a forum for software developers and scientists to present and discuss algorithms, software, and data systems used in the acquisition, reduction, analysis, and dissemination of data for Heliophysics, including space and ground-based measurements as well as models. After the successful inaugural meeting at John Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory mid-October 2023, this meeting will further connect practitioners across institutions, agencies and countries to identify common challenges and opportunities in open source software structure and design, including modern data infrastructure, methods and pipelines. International participation is the key to our community’s success, and all ranges of experience are welcome. Oct. 17-18: The IHDEA meeting will complement this conversation by focusing on the challenges and opportunities in aligning data and data products with community standards, the FAIR principles and general Open Science practices, and the software necessary for accomplishing those goals. The goal of the International Heliophysics Data Environment Alliance (IHDEA) is to encourage the use of common standards and services by major data providers, including simulation services and science platforms, in order to enable sharing of data and to enhance science. IHDEA also aims at bridging the gap between different communities such as GNSS and Earth observations communities in the context of a global Heliophysics information architecture. Looking forward to seeing you!! DASH Science Organising Committee
  • COSPAR PSW.10 “Radio Observations for Space Weather” Session…
    Dear Colleagues. This year, COSPAR will be held in Busan, South Korea, 13-21 July 2024. The extended abstract-submission deadline is 16th February 2024 and the full details of the meeting can be found here: https://www.cospar2024.org/ – which also includes all the key deadlines. Please consider submitting an abstract to the PSW.10: “Radio Observations for Space Weather” session: https://www.cospar-assembly.org/admin/session_cospar.php?session=1322 – you will need to log in to Zarm to submit an abstract. This session will aim to bring together all the key aspects of the uses of radio techniques, both on the ground and in space, for space weather and space climate advancement. Areas to be covered would include observations, modelling, the use of radio data in models, multi-faceted/multi-technique approaches where radio data form a substantial element of the investigations, and new instrumentation/architectures/infrastructure(s). It is envisaged that key members of the COSPAR ISWAT teams working with radio observations/data/modelling will participate in the session as well as some overviews of the key elements of the updated COSPAR space-weather roadmap where radio plays a key role now and in the past, and where it is envisaged to do so in the future. It is envisaged that there will be a panel/Q&A session also. Looking forward to seeing you in Busan! Best wishes, Mario.
  • UK Space Weather and Space Environment (UKSWSE) II: Celebrating 10-years of 24/7 space-weather operational forecasting in the UK – Save-the-Date and Call for Members of the SOC…
    Dear colleagues. Please save the date for the “UK Space Weather and Space Environment (UKSWSE) II: Celebrating 10-years of 24/7 space-weather operational forecasting in the UK” Meeting, 09-12 September 2024, at Sandy Park, Exeter, UK. This is the second of a series of UKSWSE Meetings and the focus of this meeting will be around the 10-year celebration of 24/7 space-weather forecasting in the UK with more details to follow in due course. We apologise that this clashes with the European Solar Physics Meeting 17, but logistics around the timing and availability of suitable venues in the Exeter area provided extremely-limited options – hence also the delay in advertising the dates openly to the community. In addition, this is also an open call for applications for membership of the Scientific Organising Committee (SOC) of UKSWSE II. The organisation of the meeting is expected to be conducted jointly by the Local Organising Committee (LOC – members, thus far are named below) and the newly-formed SOC for the 2024 occurrence. A dedicated discussion will take place in Exeter between all the participants with regards to what the community prefers going forward for any future UKSWSE Meetings. The LOC will be responsible for all logistical issues, such as the organisation at the meeting venue, arrangements for conference rooms, accommodation, catering, audio-visual provision, exploring the potential options for hybrid capabilities, etc… It will also be responsible for meeting announcements, press releases, and other outreach. The SOC will be responsible for the content of the UKSWSE II Meeting, including session titles and timetables, selection of invited and contributed speakers (although, there will be several key organisational/sector-specific invitees as provided by the LOC given the nature of the meeting), appointment of session chairs and assignment of poster submissions. The SOC will also undertake the necessary communications with all session contributors, working within the context of the logistical arrangements made by the LOC. Consideration will be given to having one cross-member of both the LOC and SOC, in order to ensure that the two are appropriately coordinated. It is anticipated that the SOC will have between six and eight members, with a sufficient diversity of expertise to cover the full range of policy, end-user, scientific, engineering, and technical issues which fall within the remit of the UKSWSE II Meeting. The SOC Chair will be self-selected from within. We expect the SOC to be appropriately diverse and gender-balanced and to ensure the same in respect of the meeting programme. Note that members of the SOC will not be expected to assume any financial risk related to the costs of the meeting, while members of the LOC are assumed to be willing to accept a share of such risk. SOC Members also forfeit any option to have an invited abstract at the meeting. For this year, preference will be given to those submitting from UK-based establishments until the discussion on potential future meetings is had at Exeter later this year. Applications for membership of the SOC should include 2-3 paragraphs of motivation and relevant past experience related to organising national/international meetings (no more than 350 words) and sent via E-Mail to Simon Machin at the Met Office (simon.machin@metoffice.gov.uk), ensuring copies are also sent to Mario Bisi at UKRI STFC RAL Space (mario.bisi@stfc.ac.uk) and Claire Garland at the Institute of Physics (claire.garland@iop.org); please use the subject line: “Interest in joining the SOC of the UKSWSE II Meeting”. The deadline for receipt of these applications is Thursday 29 February 2024 at 16:00UT; there will be no extension. Should there be too few suitable candidates, the LOC reserves the right to co-opt additional members at its discretion. The SOC outcomes are expected to be announced by the end of March 2024 at the latest. Many thanks in advance and we look forward to seeing you in Exeter in September for another energetic and exciting UKSWSE Meeting… UKSWSE II LOC: Mario M. Bisi (UKRI STFC RAL Space) Claire Garland (IOP) Mark Gibbs (Met Office) Vivien Thomas (IOP) Simon Machin (Met Office) Ian McCrea (UKRI STFC RAL Space) Krista Hammond (Met Office) Elise Allthorpe-Mullis (UKRI STFC RAL Space)

Jobs/Studentships

  • PhD Studentship at UCLan on Forecasting Solar Energetic Particle Risk for Space Weather
    Applications are invited for a PhD (via MPhil) studentship in the Jeremiah Horrocks Institute (JHI), within the School of Engineering and Computing at the University of Central Lancashire, on Forecasting Solar Energetic Particle (SEP) risk for Space Weather. The successful candidate will work on a physics-based SEP forecasting tool, and analyse SEP events to investigate the significance of different physical processes on the accuracy of the SEP forecasts. The work is performed in collaboration with JHI and Met Office personnel. The studentship is funded through the UCLan Doctoral Training Centre for Industry Collaboration and is tenable for up to 3.5 years full-time [subject to satisfactory progress]. Both Home and EU/International Applicants may apply but EU/International Applicants will be required to pay the difference in tuition fees between the UK and EU/International fee rates. The studentship will provide successful applicants with an annual stipend in line with UKRI rates (Currently £18,622 per year), subject to satisfactory progress. It is expected the successful applicant will commence in September 2024. Applications are due on 11th March 2024. To apply, see instructions at https://www.uclan.ac.uk/research/research-degrees/studentships Please quote the studentship Reference Number DTC12-22-34 For further information, see https://www.findaphd.com/phds/project/forecasting-solar-energetic-particle-risk-for-space-weather/?p169004 Informal project-related enquiries about the post can be made to Timo Laitinen (tlmlaitinen@uclan.ac.uk).
  • Two Funded PhD Opportunities – Solar and Magnetospheric Theory at the University of St Andrews
    The Solar and Magnetospheric Theory Group (SMTG) in the School and Mathematics and Statistics, University of St Andrews, is looking for applicants for two funded PhD projects for a start in September/October 2024. One project will be supervised by Dr Alexander Russell (ar51@st-andrews.ac.uk), funded by the School and Mathematics and Statistics, on the subject of either Turbulent magnetic reconnection or Waves and instabilities in weakly-collisional plasmas. The other project will be supervised by Dr Tom Elsden (te55@st-andrews.ac.uk), funded by the UK’s Science and Technology Facilities Council (STFC), in the area of Modelling ultra-low frequency (ULF) waves in Earth’s magnetosphere. Information about the PhD programme and application process, including eligibility criteria and how to apply, can be found at https://www.st-andrews.ac.uk/mathematics-statistics/prospective/pgr/ . The selection process will start on 1 March 2024 and will continue until a suitable candidate has been identified. Please find further details on the University of St Andrews and the specific research projects below: Supervised by Dr Alexander Russell:
    • A: Turbulent magnetic reconnection: Magnetic reconnection is responsible for many of the Sun’s most spectacular events including solar flares that affect technology at Earth. Understanding how magnetic reconnection works in the Sun, and especially the role of turbulence, is an important scientific goal that is currently making new progress thanks to insights from the latest-generation computer simulations. Your research in this area could include exploring how the reconnection process depends on global properties of the system or using mathematical tools to investigate the topology of magnetic fields inside the reconnection layer.
    • B: Waves and instabilities in weakly-collisional plasmas: The Sun’s corona (its outer atmosphere) has a temperature above one million Celsius, which is more than 100 times hotter than its visible surface. Maintaining this extremely high temperature requires heating, at least some of which is believed to be caused by waves and turbulence. Most mathematical knowledge about coronal heating by waves is based on a mathematical description called MHD, which unfortunately becomes invalid where key processes occur. The goal for this project is to investigate how coronal heating by waves extends to more suitable models that allow for pressure anisotropy.
    Supervised by Dr Tom Elsden:
    • Modelling ultra-low frequency (ULF) waves in Earth’s magnetosphere: ULF waves are large scale and low frequency oscillations of Earth’s magnetic field which transport energy and momentum throughout the magnetosphere. They also play an important role in the acceleration of particles trapped in Earth’s magnetic field to high energies, which create a dangerous environment for satellites and astronauts. This project will involve magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) computational modelling of these waves, as well as considering how they may contribute to particle acceleration. The emphasis of the project is computational/numerical and we expect the successful candidate to have coding experience or aptitude for numerical work.
    The minimum academic entry requirement is a UK upper second class honours degree (or equivalent) in Applied Mathematics, Physics or a closely related subject. Apart from excellent academic qualifications, we expect applicants to have the motivation and enthusiasm to enable them to successfully work on an extended research project in solar and magnetospheric theory. The SMTG currently has 8 academic staff, 5 PDRAs and 10 PhD students. It is one of three research groups in the Applied Mathematics Division of the School of Mathematics and Statistics, University of St Andrews. Both the SMTG and the Applied Mathematics Division run research seminar programmes during semester to help students develop a broad knowledge of their subject. The School of Mathematics and Statistics at the University of St Andrews values diversity and nurtures an inclusive community where everyone is treated with dignity and respect regardless of individual characteristics such as age, gender, disability, religion or ethnicity. It is firmly committed to the progression of women, and other historically under-represented groups, in mathematics and holds a Bronze Award of the Athena SWAN programme for women in science. A growing proportion of our Ph.D. students are women, currently approximately 40%. The school supports the principles of the London Mathematical Society Good Practice Scheme.
  • Research Assistant/Research Associate in Solar Physics and Space Science
    Applications are invited for a Research Assistant/Associate to work on theoretical and computational analysis of MHD waves generation by vortical drivers, the interaction of multiple vortex tubes located within intergranular lanes and how they contribute to the middle and upper solar atmosphere dynamics. Plasma flows in the Sun’s photosphere have the potential to excite a wide range of magnetohydrodynamic waves and may have a prominent role in both direct and alternating current models of solar atmospheric heating. The following method(s) for analysis will be used: HPC numerical modelling, Proper Orthogonal decomposition (POD), Dynamic Mode Decomposition (DMD), Lagrangian-averaged vorticity deviation (LAVD), Machine Learning & Artificial Intelligence. You will be expected to have a good honours degree in a scientific or engineering discipline and be capable of producing high quality research. You should have significant knowledge and experience of solar data processing and will be able to develop software (and adapt available software) to support the research. If appointed as a Research Associate you must also have a PhD (or be close to completion) and have research experience in solar data processing, as well as evidence of submissions to high quality peer reviewed journals. You should have significant knowledge and experience of solar data processing and will be able to develop software (and adapt available software) to support the research. The University of Sheffield is one of the best not-for-profit organisations to work for in the UK. The University’s Total Reward Package includes a competitive salary, a generous Pension Scheme and annual leave entitlement, as well as access to a range of learning and development courses to support your personal and professional development. We build teams of people from different heritages and lifestyles whose talent and contributions complement each other to greatest effect. We believe diversity in all its forms delivers greater impact through research, teaching and student experience. Application link : https://jobs.shef.ac.uk/sap/bc/webdynpro/sap/hrrcf_a_posting_apply?PARAM=cG9zdF9pbnN0X2d1aWQ9NjVCQzZGQkJEMDZDMjBDMkUxMDAwMDAwQUMxRTg4NzgmY2FuZF90eXBlPUVYVA%3d%3d&sap-client=400&sap-language=EN&sap-accessibility=X&sap-ep-themeroot=%2fSAP%2fPUBLIC%2fBC%2fUR%2fuos# For more details, please, contact Viktor Fedun (v.fedun@sheffield.ac.uk)
  • 3 Postdoctoral Positions, 2 PhD Positions, and 1 Software Postdoctoral position for the SOUL project at KU Leuven
    The application deadline is 25/04/2024. —————————- We invite motivated candidates to apply for PhD and postdoctoral positions as part of the new Centre of Excellence SOUL (https://fys.kuleuven.be/ster/research-projects/soul/soul): Stellar evOlution in fUll gLory, a long-term project receiving structural funds from the Flemish government and awarded to Conny Aerts, Hugues Sana, Leen Decin, and Tom Van Doorsselaere. SOUL bridges the Institute of Astronomy (IoA) and the Centre of mathematical Plasma Astrophysics (CmPA) of KU Leuven in Belgium and aims to develop 3D models of evolving close binaries and star-planet systems. The 4 PIs are well embedded in international consortia and collaborations, involving worldwide observatories on ground and in space, as well as high-performance computing centres. The vacancies The following initial SOUL positions at KU Leuven (Belgium) are offered: (1)  A 2-year postdoctoral position with the prospect of an extension up to 4 years. This position is aimed at the construction of numerical 3D magnetohydrodynamic models of stellar atmospheres. The first step is to implement a new physics module in an existing numerical code, either MPI-AMRVAC (in Fortran) or COOLFLUID (in C++). Thus, experience in working with HPC codes and supercomputing is desirable. The new physics module incorporates Alfven and kink wave heating of the stellar atmosphere based on a working 1D proof-of-concept. Then, the new numerical code will be applied to construct models for atmospheres and stellar winds in the cool star regime. For this, experience with stellar magnetic fields and their extrapolation is desirable. Inquiries: tom.vandoorsselaere@kuleuven.be (2)   A 2-year postdoctoral position with the prospect of an extension up to 4 years. This position is aimed at understanding the gas-phase chemistry and dust nucleation phases in evolved (binary) stars, with a particular focus on Asymptotic Giant Branch stars. The first step will be to include a recently developed neural network emulating gas-phase chemistry (MACE) within the SPH hydrodynamical code PHANTOM allowing on-the-fly gas-phase chemical predictions for complex hydrodynamical systems. Then, we will delve into understanding the impact of vibrational disequilibrium for the formation of dust-forming species. Inquiries: leen.decin@kuleuven.be (3)   A 2-year postdoctoral position with the prospect of an extension up to 4 years. This position will lead to new constraints on the stellar structure and evolution of massive single, binary or multiple stars. This will be achieved by using ongoing and future large observational campaigns in which KU Leuven is involved, including the BLOeM ESO large program, the Gaia, TESS, UVEX and CubeSPEC space missions. In addition to this, various observing campaigns with the Mercator telescope and ESO facilities are ongoing. With these observations we obtain various samples of massive stars, binary products, stripped stars and binaries with compact objects. The long-term goal is to enable the calibration of uncertain physics affecting populations synthesis computations of gravitational wave progenitors. Inquiries: hugues.sana@kuleuven.be (4)  A 2 + 2-year PhD position. Within this position we will build numerical 3D magnetohydrodynamic models for stellar atmospheres in a binary system. The student will work in close collaboration with the postdoc who implements the numerical model and extend their work to binary systems. The aim is to quantify binary mass exchanges in advanced atmospheric models of star-star and star-planet systems. Previous student projects or internships with supercomputing and programming for MHD are a plus. In-depth knowledge of plasma physics is essential. Inquiries: tom.vandoorsselaere@kuleuven.be (5)   A 2 + 2-year PhD position. The aim of this position is to provide the temporal evolution of the multiplicity properties as massive stars age and interact. The student will utilise Mercator, VLT, Gaia and TESS observations to map the evolution of supernova progenitors. Interpretation of these data will provide a first statistically meaningful homogeneous sample of quiescent neutron star and black hole single-degenerate binaries in the Milky Way. Our improved statistics will serve as benchmark for the theoretical computations. Inquiries: hugues.sana@kuleuven.be (6)   A 2-year software postdoctoral position with the prospect of an extension up to 4 years. This IT-oriented position will optimise and further develop scientific software codes describing the evolution of stellar rotation, magnetism, oscillations, outflows, and tides in close binaries and planetary systems in 3 spatial dimensions. In addition, they will be responsible for interfacing the various software codes where needed and developing machine learning (ML) algorithms to interpret data and reduce computation time. The candidate will streamline the installation of required software. In addition to this they will lead and manage high-performance computing (HPC) time applications to European supercomputers to facilitate, operate, document, and help interpret SOUL simulations. Experience in software development, ML, and HPC is an asset, particularly in C++ and FORTRAN. Inquiries: conny.aerts@kuleuven.be The Host Institutes The Institute of Astronomy (IoA) and Centre of mathematical Plasma Astrophysics (CmPA)  of KU Leuven in Belgium are young and vibrant research groups approximately 150 scientists, engineers, and administrative staff. For more information: see http://fys.kuleuven.be/ster/ (IoA) and https://wis.kuleuven.be/CmPA (CmPA) Inquiries and applications The preferred starting date for all positions is between August 1st and October 1st 2024. Application Deadline: March 25th 2024 Selection Deadline: May 1st 2024 For more information and to apply please visit the KU Leuven vacancies page: For the software and postdoc positions: https://www.kuleuven.be/personeel/jobsite/jobs/60305236?lang=en For PhD positions: https://www.kuleuven.be/personeel/jobsite/jobs/60305230?lang=en
  • Postdoctoral Researcher, Space Research Laboratory
    The Space Research Laboratory at University of Turku, Finland invites applications for contract-based, fixed term postdoctoral researcher position for 2 years. The starting time of the position is flexible but no later than 1st of July 2024. The Space Research Laboratory in the Department of Physics and Astronomy in the University of Turku is a leading European space physics group specialised both in observations and theoretical/computational modelling of space plasmas and solar energetic particles. We are now opening a postdoctoral researcher position for 2 years, funded by a Research Council of Finland project ‘SolShocks’. This position will focus on imaging and spectroscopy of radio shock signatures from the Sun with the Low Frequency Array (LOFAR). Apply between 23 January 2024 and 26 February 2024 16:00 (Europe/Helsinki). You can apply here: https://ats.talentadore.com/apply/tutkijatohtori-avaruustutkimuslaboratorio/Zvr5JO?lang=en The candidate should hold a PhD in solar or space physics, or a related field. Prior knowledge and useful skills include experience with Python data analysis and multi-wavelength solar observations. In particular, we welcome candidates with previous knowledge of radio interferometry, big data handling and high-performance computing. We offer a position in a dynamic and international research group, with a possibility to network and to develop as a researcher. We are innovative, high-spirited and a close community. Finland also offers a great environment fostering equality, equality of opportunities, the best schooling system, vacations, and possibilities for work-life balance. We take care of your well-being at work and the functionality of your everyday life, e.g. with the help of flexible working hours and our well-being services.